Posts Tagged ‘YouTube’


PaaS Partner YouTube Update July 2017

The July edition of the PaaS & Middleware Partner Update contains three key topics:

· PaaS Overview webcast and sales resources for Oracle Partners

· PaaS Summer Camps 2017 and Integration & extend Bootcamps

· Community Webcast about Wercker on July 21st 2017

 

For regular updates please subscribe to our YouTube channel here. Thanks for your likes and sharing the video on YouTube and LinkedIn. For the latest WebLogic & Developer Partner Community information please visit our Community update wiki here (Community membership required)

WebLogic Partner Community

For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Technorati Tags: YouTube,PaaS,Cloud,Middleware Update,WebLogic,WebLogic Community,Oracle,OPN,Jürgen Kress

 

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At the e WebLogic Community Workspace (WebLogic Community membership required) the latest presentations are available:

· AppDev Roadmap Update 11.2016.pptx

· ACCS and CanDo 11.2016.pptx

· JCS_and_Stack Manager.pptx

· WebLogic and Java EE Containers in ACC 2016-12-13.pptx

The workspace is organized by product categories in folders e.g. WebLogic or ADF JDeveloper and Forms or Coherence or ExaLogic or Glassfish or Java & Developer Cloud or Tuxedo. You can also use tags to navigate within the workspace. For large downloads we do recommend to map the workspace as a network drive or to use the ftp functions.

WebLogic Partner Community

For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Technorati Tags: YouTube,PaaS,Cloud,Middleware Update,WebLogic,WebLogic Community,Oracle,OPN,Jürgen Kress

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Some of my recent experiences with the Oracle Cloud left me less than wildly enthusiastic. Actions seemed to take long in a non-responsive, non-intuitive UI and I was required to go through too many configuration steps to get various cloud services to work together. Getting a free month trial seemed a lengthy process – if it went through at all. The other vendors seemed to be able to offer more/better/greener pastures.

Yesterday I had my faith restored at least to some extent. I had the following experiences with Oracle Cloud:

· I requested a Trial Environment through the website. Within 15 minutes after requesting the PaaS trial, I was sent an email that confirmed a month long access to 11 cloud services – including the latest ones (Container Cloud, MySQL Cloud, GoldenGate Cloud and the DbaaS for Release 12cR2)

· I provisioned a DBaaS instance – and could create one for Oracle Database 12cR2 (12.2.0.1), the very latest release that I had not previously been able to make use of outside the Beta program.

· I ran into an issue – my misunderstanding as it turned out – with Storage Cloud and was helped almost instantly through an Live Oracle Cloud Chat conversation by an operator (Erik Castro) who did a great job; within 80 seconds after initiating the chat, the conversation started and within 2 minutes Erik had directed me to the solution. At a moment I was starting to get quite frustrated (from not understanding the documentation, as it turned out)

· I used Oracle Cloud Stack to provision a stack of DBaaS, JCS and Storage Cloud (including of course Compute Cloud). Previously, I would have had to first create a container on Storage Cloud, provision a database on DBaaS before I could even start provisioning the JCS instance. With Cloud Stack (as I will describe in this article) I had to provide one page worth of entries and Cloud Stack took care of provisioning the service instances – co-configured with each other and ready to use.

A quick overview of the motions I went through with Oracle Cloud Stack: Read the complete article here.

WebLogic Partner Community

For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Dubai Airports customer reference video: Dubai Airports, one of the largest airports in the world with over 60 million annual passengers and $1.7 billion in revenue, wanted to automate its employee lifecycle processes. It turned to Oracle and was able to use Oracle Mobile Cloud Service, Java Cloud Service, and SOA Cloud Service, to fill process gaps, integrate those processes with existing systems, and extend those processes onto mobile devices so that employees could access these anytime, anywhere. Watch the video here.

WebLogic Partner Community

For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Why do cloud-native projects outperform traditional enterprise development?

Siddhartha Agarwal, vice president of product management and strategy for Oracle Cloud Platform and Oracle Fusion Middleware, talks with Oracle Magazine about the cultural shifts, technologies, and common patterns he sees in cloud-native application design and development.

Oracle Magazine: What is cloud-native development?

Agarwal: Cloud-native development refers to a modern application development paradigm that focuses on developing applications for the cloud first or only for cloud. With cloud-native development, applications can be delivered faster and in a more agile fashion than traditional applications.

Oracle Magazine: What are the challenges for executives overseeing cloud-native development projects?

Agarwal: The biggest challenge is cultural. Executives want “big bang” projects but traditionally have seen those projects take months and years to deliver. Cloud-native approaches take that development cycle down to days and weeks. But faster delivery means feedback and guidance from business executives is needed sooner rather than later.

This cultural shift goes up and down the organizational structure. Those building the applications need to understand the timeline to delivery. Those accepting the applications need to realize that what isn’t quite right the first time will be easily fixed and extended in the next release. This forces a lot more communication within teams and across teams—all good outcomes—but it can be a jarring organizational change.

Oracle Magazine: What challenges do cloud-native developers and projects face, and how does Oracle address them?

Agarwal: The big challenge for cloud-native developers is bringing together a solution and process that addresses the several major components of cloud-native development. Building microservices, for example, can be difficult because developers cannot depend on them running on a particular server. Leveraging Docker containers is challenging because container orchestration requires an orchestration layer, long-running web services require scheduling, and so on.

It is often easy to find a solution that manages Docker containers for a developer team or to find an API management solution or to find a mobile development platform. What is hard is bringing together the complete solution that enables developers to deliver applications on that platform in a fully automated DevOps-friendly environment.

Our solution is the Oracle Cloud Platform AppDev set of services. We’ve examined the five or six capabilities that a cloud-native platform needs—DevOps, microservices, API management, Docker, mobile, and diagnostics—and built a platform where these are tightly integrated to work together.

Oracle’s solution is more than first-class cloud-native tools—it’s an ecosystem that these projects need: services for integration, collaboration, data, identity, management, and so on.

Oracle Magazine: What are typical use cases for going cloud-native?

Agarwal: We see several patterns over and over again.

Customers are doing new cloud application development, often in their new business areas. Typically these projects start with a mobile front end and a back-end data service. A set of microservices implements the business rules and persistence. The new cloud-native apps connect to source software-as-a-service [SaaS] and on-premises applications via an API and integration solution. This net-new cloud application development pattern is supported by Oracle’s platform-as-a-service [PaaS] solutions, including Oracle Mobile Cloud Service, Oracle Application Container Cloud services, Oracle API Platform Cloud Service, and Oracle Integration Cloud Service. In addition, Oracle’s infrastructure-as-a-service [IaaS] platform provides high-performance compute and container-as-a-service capabilities to run any microservices/container-based applications for DevTest or production.

Then, there are Oracle customers running an enterprise Java application on Oracle WebLogic Server or Oracle SOA Suite as a key part of their on-premises portfolio. They’ll transparently migrate those applications to our Oracle Java Cloud Service, Oracle SOA Cloud Service, and Oracle Database Cloud Service. But inevitably they want to modernize those applications with cloud-native capabilities including a mobile front end, a new business microservice, and an API for external access.

This modernize-and-extend application development pattern leverages cloud services that enable cloud-native development—Oracle Mobile Cloud Service, Oracle Application Container Cloud services, and Oracle API Platform Cloud Service—alongside cloud services to modernize on-premises Oracle and non-Oracle workloads.

Finally, there is an application development pattern for extending SaaS applications via microservices and mobility to deliver a new business process or experience that spans multiple SaaS/on-premises applications. For example, suppose a business wants to integrate information from multiple SaaS applications to deliver a custom mobile experience—such as a chatbot—to drive prospect excitement and loyalty. Like the other two application development patterns, we see this one over and over again.

Ultimately, in every application development pattern, the cloud-native experience lets developers solve business problems quickly and gain immediate value. Read the complete article here.

WebLogic Partner Community

For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Technorati Tags: YouTube,PaaS,Cloud,Middleware Update,WebLogic,WebLogic Community,Oracle,OPN,Jürgen Kress

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Introduction

Currently there is not a single discussion about cloud native architectures where the term “microservices” is not brought up. With more and more developers and architects considering leveraging this architectural style, a lot of great content is showing up, but some of this new content misses the point on microservices completely. A good example of the latter is content that suggests one is building microservices just by making the applications package smaller (“micro”).

This blog is the start of a four-part series of posts that aims to provide a better understanding of what microservices are and how to work with them productively. In this introductory post, we’ll cover some of the advantages of microservices and discuss some of the challenges you should be aware of when building microservices-based applications. The second part covers how microservices and containers play together, and how to take advantage of orchestration and container management tools such as Kubernetes. The third part discusses microservices design principles and microservices devops best practices. The series will wrap up with a blog post about Oracle’s current and exciting future support for microservices-based applications.

Advantages of Microservices

Before looking into what makes microservices so appealing we should have a quick look at what they are. While there is no standard for microservices architectures, the industry mostly agrees on a couple of design points and characteristics that a microservices architecture should follow which are mentioned below.

In general, you can think of applications designed using the microservices architecture as applications composed of small autonomous services. These services are very loosely coupled, only communicate through APIs, and are less complex and thus smaller as they generally focus only on a single functionality centered around a business capability (bounded context) of the application. Basically, instead of building a big single codebase for an entire application (monolith), the application is composed of services, each with its own code base and state that are managed independently by smaller agile teams. This allows companies to develop, deploy and update parts of their application in a faster, more agile way, and thereby react to new market requirements and competition in a more timely and flexible manner. Netflix and other “born in the cloud companies” serve as prime examples of successful microservices architectures.

With time to market and agility being the main drivers for using microservices, the big question is what enables that agility and speed? The answer to this question leads to the main advantages of microservices.

Independent deployments

With a large monolithic application, fast reliable deployments can be problematic. Think about a scenario where you want to introduce a new feature, for example adding a new field for a user profile, or simply fixing a bug. A monolithic application is typically built and deployed as a single, entire application, requiring the need to build and test the entire application to make sure that a small change does not break any other component in the application. The entire application must also then be redeployed, including all those other components that have not changed. Depending on the size, technologies, and processes used, building and deploying an update can take quite some time. Read Part 1: Advantages and Considerations and read Part 2: Containers and Microservices

 

WebLogic Partner Community

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ANNOUNCING Application Development Platform 17.1.1 with useful new updates, enhancements, and relevant announcements to a vast range of services in the Application Development portfolio, including Java Cloud, Application Container Cloud, Developer Cloud, Application Builder Cloud, Database Cloud, Exadata Express Cloud, and more.

Java Cloud Service

· JCS added support for Oracle Database 12.2

Application Container Cloud Service

· Support for new caching capability, enabling faster and cheaper access to data, data source offload, and reliable, scalable state and data management. See Using Caches in Oracle Application Container Cloud Service.

· Maximum application shutdown time can now be specified. This permits a user to instruct ACCS to wait up to 600 seconds for an application to clean up or close resources before it is forcibly terminated. See Creating Metadata Files in Developing for Oracle Application Container Cloud Service.

· Java runtimes updated to versions 7u121 and 8u112.

· Node.js runtimes update to versions 0.10.48, 0.12.17, 4.6.1, and 6.9.1.

· Abhishek Gupta authored an excellent blog on deploying Javamicroservices on ACCS and IaaS to run message producers and consumers using Jersey and Kafka.

Developer Cloud Service

Recent Blogs

· Deploying Dropwizard application on Application Container Cloud using Developer Cloud Service

· Microservice Approach – Oracle Developer Cloud to build and deploy Nodejs and DBCS REST service projects.

· Deployment on Oracle SOA Cloud Service using Developer Cloud service

Application Builder Cloud Service

Recent Blogs

· Coding Sample in Oracle Application Builder Cloud Service

· Explaining Custom Objects Relationships Regular vs Parent/Child

· UI Extensions in Application Builder Cloud Service

Common Platform Features (PaaS Service Manager)

· Getting Started with Stack Manager video

Learn More

· Java Cloud Service: jcs.us.oracle.com

· Application Container Cloud Service: acc.us.oracle.com

· Developer Cloud Service:  portal page

· Application Builder Cloud Service: portal page

· Exadata Express Cloud Service: portal page

· Database Cloud Service: portal page

Partner Resources (community membership required)

Sales Kits: DevOps: Agility for Dev / Test / Deploy & App Development and Deployment in the Cloud: Java EE Development & Testing & App Development and Deployment in the Cloud: Lightweight Web Applications & Reduce TCO through Consolidation&

WebLogic Partner Community

For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Technorati Tags: YouTube,PaaS,Cloud,Middleware Update,WebLogic,WebLogic Community,Oracle,OPN,Jürgen Kress