Posts Tagged ‘JET’

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This is the first blog in a series of two blogs about Karma testing (with code coverage) for Oracle JET. This first blog will help you with setting up the files in the project to get karma up and running. The second blog can be found here and will show you how to actually test your code in the viewModels.

Start a new project.

First we start our new Oracle JET project following the example on the Oracle JET website.

Now check if your project is working by running:

Next step is to add all the npm modules for karma, jasmine and supporting coverage reports.

Add a directory named test, this is where the testfiles will be. Add a file named test-main.js in the directory and leave it empty for now.

Karma Configuration.

Go back to the main directory of your project. Next step is to make the configurations for karma, I do this using

The framework we are using is Jasmine, we do need the Require.js plugin so answer yes for that question. I use Chrome as a browser but you can pick whatever browser you like. All the other questions I left empty or answered with “no”.

Open the karma.conf.js and add the libraries, viewModel, testfiles and the test-main file to files. Read the complete article here.

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Technorati Tags: WebLogic Community,Oracle,OPN,Jürgen Kress

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I worked with JB Brock yesterday on setting up and using Oracle JET’s new Composite Component Architecture.

The aim of it all is to have reusable components that enable you to define your own HTML elements, like this, for example:

<!-- ko foreach: employees -->

Above you see a Knockout for-each loop which iterates through ’employees’ and creates a new DOM element named "demo-card" for each of them.

The above is in the view, e.g., in "home.html", while "home.js", i.e., the viewModel, defines "employees" as follows: Read the complete article here.

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Almost a year ago on OpenWorld 2015, Oracle announced the arrival of Oracle JET, a collection of open source JavaScript libraries along with a set of Oracle contributed JavaScript libraries.

Oracle JET is open source and aimed at web developers who want to quickly create enterprise-class JavaScript applications that run seamlessly on any browser and any device.

Oracle JET Sample Application

So what does Oracle JET have to do with Siebel CRM?

Out-of-the-box, there is no connection whatsoever between Oracle JET and Siebel CRM. Siebel Open UI is an enterprise-class JavaScript application but is built upon a proprietary framework developed by Oracle’s Siebel engineers.

But nothing (well maybe something…) is holding you back if you want to hook up Siebel CRM and Oracle JET. Let’s discuss two possible scenarios.

Scenario 1: Build a JET application that consumes Siebel data

The question might now be: Why on earth would you do that? Siebel Open UI allows you to consume Siebel data in a browser and device of your choice already.

True, but many desktop-style applications are just a bit too overcustomized and “big” for small screens. Read the complete article here.

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I have completed my OOW’16 session [CON2388] today. For those of you who could not attend it, check slides online (I will post sample code later, read more about the session here): Get the slides here.

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imageOracle JET Hybrid enabled with Cordova Push plugin can receive notifications sent from Oracle Mobile Cloud Service (MCS). You should read how to setup infrastructure in this article – Your first Push notification based Oracle JET Hybrid application!. I will focus on implementation steps and will provide working sample app for download.
Sample JET hybrid application provides login functionality. During login we register device ID with MCS service, this allows to receive notifications:

After login is completed, default dashboard page is displayed. At this point, application is ready to receive notification (even if application will be closed or mobile device screen is locked):

Notification from MCS can be sent programmatically from API implementation. I will show this in the next posts. For now we can use MCS UI to test if notification is working. Mobile Backend provides functionality to send notifications. I can target notification to specific user: Read the complete article here.

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There are many map components in the world out there—and I have documented how to integrate several of them in an Oracle JET application, e.g., 3DCityDB, Mapbox, Leaflet, and LuciadRIA, as well as Oracle JET’s ojThematicMap component.

However, Oracle has its own map component, as described in detail below, which includes the Oracle Maps Javascript library:

http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/middleware/mapviewer/overview/index.html

Oracle Fusion Middleware MapViewer is a development toolkit for incorporating interactive maps and spatial analyses. It is optimized for use with Oracle Spatial and Graph. (The related Oracle blog is blogs.oracle.com/oracle_maps_blog.) Here below is how it looks when integrated into an Oracle JET application, with many thanks to my colleague Jayant Sharma, who made it happen and provided the instructions that follow, which I have successfully used and I can report that it works.

Instructions for integrating Oracle Fusion Middleware MapViewer with Oracle JET, assuming you have set up an Oracle JET application, e.g., via the Oracle JET QuickStart Basic template:

  1. Add the Oracle Maps V2 kit into js/libs as a folder named ‘oraclemaps’. The kit can be downloaded from here and specifically here: http://download.oracle.com/otn/other/mapviewer/12c/12211/v2_122110_full.zip
  2. Modify "main.js" to include the various Oracle map libraries, in the requires.config "path" and "shim" sections. I.e., add these entries in the "paths" section: Read the complete article here.

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As we are using Oracle Jet more and more these days we thought it would be great to add ECMAScript 6 (ES6 for short) support by creating a base project to serve as a starting point for application development.

What is ES6?

From Wikipedia:

ECMAScript (ES) is a trademarked scripting-language specification standardized by Ecma International in ECMA-262 and ISO/IEC 16262. It was based on JavaScript, which now tracks ECMAScript. It is commonly used for client-side scripting on the World Wide Web. Other implementations of ECMAScript include JScript and ActionScript.

The latest version of ECMAScript – ES6 – was finalised in June 2015, adding significant syntax improvements and features coming from other languages like python. Not surprisingly, this new version was immediately adopted by the community, even without incomplete browser support. To cope with the problem a conversion process from ES6 to ES5 can be run when building an application.

Why use it?

The list below summarises our top ES6 features – feel free to check out the ES6 standard for the full specification.

· Classes ES6 classes simplify structure and make code much more readable than the prototype-based pattern, plus adding inheritance support. Read the complete article here.

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