Posts Tagged ‘Frank Nimphius’

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Often, in enterprise mobile application development, there is more need for mobile applications to build than mobile skills in house. To bridge mobile skill shortage, the idea of citizen developers had been thrown into the ring and since generated a lot of interest in enterprise development.

Technology research company Gartner defines citizen developer as "a user who creates new business applications for consumption by others using development and runtime environments sanctioned by corporate IT". While the quote well defines the mission, Gartner does not provide guidance on how citizen development should be adopted on an enterprise IT level so business application developers and core IT work hand-in-hand instead of in a parallel universe.

Citizen development promotes a guided do-it-yourself culture when it comes to building mobile and web applications quickly. The idea is to release the pressure on core IT for delivering all the mobile applications while still helping lines of business to go mobile the way they want. Citizen development-ship however is not shadow IT, and where it is, it should not be. Citizen development works best if integrated in core IT principles and infrastructure.

So which methodology is best for adopting citizen development in an enterprise? The two candidate methodologies I like to come up with are top-down or bottom-up. Let me first explain what I mean by the two before calling out a winner.

Using a top-down methodology, the business user starts from nothing, mocking up screens, views and data. Citizen developer don’t know about services, which means that they would use a tool that allows them to query for business objects or to upload sample data as CSV files. Once they are done with their prototype, they pass it on to core IT to wire-up the data used in the mobile application to data in cloud and on-premise services.

Top-down is convenient to the business developer as it is a visual first development that doesn’t require any technical skill at all (assuming the tool guides the user well). Core IT probably will then look at building business objects for the data used in the mockup and link them, as mentioned, to REST or SOAP services. Read the complete article here.

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With the recent release of Oracle MAF 2.1.3 a new utility becomes available that simplifies access to Oracle Mobile Cloud Services (MCS) from Oracle MAF applications. Oracle MAF MCS Utility (MAF MCS Utility in short) is a Java library for Oracle MAF applications and exposes  MCS client platform REST API calls as native Java calls. This blog post introduces Oracle MAF MCS Utility, explains what it does, how it works and where to find it.

Oracle Mobile Cloud Service client API

Oracle MCS is all about REST! Any mobile client that is capable of sending REST requests and to handle JSON responses can invoke MCS mobile platform functionality exposed on a mobile backend (MBE). This includes calls to Analytics, Notification, Storage, User Information and Custom API.

About MCS client SDK

REST is a good choice for Oracle MCS and ensures an understandable and very easy to use application development interface.

From the perspective of mobile application developers however, accessing REST interfaces from mobile applications is a mental mismatch. To access REST APIs from a mobile application developers need to "think REST" though their comfort zone is within their favorite programming language, which for mobile usually means Objective-C, Java or scripting.

To address this lack of developer comfort and to improve developer productivity, Oracle MCS provides development language specific client SDKs. The MCS client SDK provides a native language abstraction to the underlying REST calls (for Android and Objective-C at current, as well as Xamarin), plus handy infrastructure functionality like offline synchronization and support for push notification registration and handling.

The image below shows the basic architecture pattern implemented by all Oracle MCS SDKs. All in all, using the MCS SDK makes developers more productive, requiring them to write less code. Read the complete article here.

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Mobile & Mobile Cloud Service hands-on training by product management – August 17-21 2015 Lisbon

clip_image002Trainers: Grant Ronald & Frank Nimphius

Duration 4 Days

A successful mobile business is like an iceberg on open sea. Only the smallest portion of a mobile application resides on the mobile device where it renders the visual user interface and executes the client logic. The bigger part, and the heavy lifting, is hidden as infrastructure services on remote servers where it performs tasks like providing mobile optimized APIs, integrate remote SOAP and REST services, manage mobile users for an application or use case, store content and similar common mobile tasks. On the public cloud, infrastructure that provides the mobile backend to mobile applications is referred to as MbaaS (Mobile backend as a Service).  Oracle Mobile Cloud Service is the MbaaS solution by Oracle. Oracle MCS is a new Oracle public cloud offering that releases close to the time of the EMEA Oracle Fusion Middleware (OFM) Summer Camp in Lisbon 2015. The Mobile Product Management teaclip_image005m at Oracle takeclip_image004s this, the upcoming first release of Oracle MCS and the OFM Summer Camp 2015, as an opportunity to offer a 4 1/2 day training on Oracle MCS. Beside of learning all about Oracle MCS, attendees will have the opportunity to try and experience Oracle MCS in a hands-on workshop using the Oracle MCS Cloud portal UI, Google Postman, Curl and Oracle Mobile Application Framework (MAF). This training enables you to use Oracle MCS in your own mobile projects and provides all information you need to know to immediately get started.

For details and agenda please visit our OFM Summer Camps registration page here.

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The Fusion Middleware Partner Community Forum takes place March 3rd & 4th in Budapest Hungary. During this annual conference You as an Oracle Partner can get the latest updates on the Fusion Middleware 12c solutions. “The Cloud Platform for Digital Business” will be the theme of the 20th conference. Keynotes will be delivered from Amit Zavery, Andrew Sutherland and SOA, BPM and Mobile product management including live demos. On the second day you can choose between three tracks: SOA, BPM or WebLogic and Mobile. As part of the Mobile & Weblogic track Frank will present:

Developing for the Digital Enterprise: Extending your ADF Applications to Mobile

Cloud computing and mobile are two new horizons showing for Oracle ADF developers. If you like it or not, the world of information technology has started to change, shifting its weight towards mobility everywhere and for everyone with a strong push for public Clouds. This session is not a statement of direction for Oracle ADF but discusses the options you as ADF developers have when travelling towards one or both of the new horizons. Come with pen and paper to learn about what you can change, what you may want to keep and which new skills you need to put onto your skill wish-list."

Frank Nimphius

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Oracle Corporation

Senior Principal Product Manager
LinkedIn & Blog

For details please visit our Fusion Middleware Partner Community Forum registration page here.

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clip_image002Share information among features in Oracle Mobile Application Framework.

Oracle Mobile Application Framework is the successor framework to Oracle Application Development Framework Mobile (Oracle ADF Mobile) for building on-device applications for iOS and Android platforms. This article steps you through one way to perform a common developer task in Oracle Mobile Application Framework: sharing information among Application Mobile XML (AMX) features.

A feature in Oracle Mobile Application Framework is a unit of work—a single piece of application functionality that users can access from the mobile application springboard. An example of a feature is a product catalog in which users can query and select items to buy. AMX is one of three technologies that you can use to develop features in Oracle Mobile Application Framework.

Oracle Mobile Application Framework mobile applications can be developed in Oracle JDeveloper with the Oracle Mobile Application Framework extension, or in Eclipse with Oracle Enterprise Pack for Eclipse. In this article’s hands-on exercise, you’ll use Oracle JDeveloper and Oracle Mobile Application Framework to implement a customers feature that shares information about the selected customer with an orders feature.

Architecture Overview

Figure 1 shows a simplified architecture diagram for Oracle Mobile Application Framework. A mobile application built with Oracle Mobile Application Framework is compiled into a platform-specific container that is then deployed to a mobile device. From the perspective of the device, the container makes the application appear to be written in the device’s native OS language (Objective-C for iOS or Java for Android). Read the complete article here.

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Frank Nimphius takes to the stage to demonstrate consuming web services from Oracle MAF applications.  This series of videos includes intro level descriptions to data controls, bindings, REST and SOAP.  It then shifts up a gear to cover programmatic access to web services from Java in Oracle MAF.  If you are looking to skill up on Oracle MAF please subscribe to the channel.

  • clip_image002Introduction and Overview – YouTube
  • Designing and Developing a MAF Application – YouTube
  • UI Development in Oracle MAF – YouTube
  • Working with Data and Web Services – YouTube
  • Working with Local SQLite Database – YouTube
  • Integrating with Device Services – YouTube
  • Oracle MAF Security – YouTube
  • Oracle Enterprise Pack for Eclipse – YouTube

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Render an unknown number of task flows in page or dashboard regions.
Oracle Application Development Framework (Oracle ADF) regions display the contents of bounded task flows in designated areas on a page. Each region uses a special binding configuration—the task flow binding—in the Executables section of the parent page’s PageDef.xml file to populate the region content with data from the Oracle ADF binding layer.

In use cases such as analytic dashboards, the contents of an unknown number of task flows must be displayed as regions at runtime. However, Oracle ADF regions cannot be created at runtime. Multi-task-flow binding in Oracle JDeveloper 11g Release 2 and Oracle JDeveloper 12c addresses this limitation. Using a hands-on exercise, this article shows developers how to use multi-task-flow binding in Oracle ADF applications. Parts of the sample application have been prebuilt to give you a head start. In addition to performing the hands-on steps, you can learn more by examining the source files.
To begin, download the sample application and unzip the o44adf-2197040.zip file to a local folder on your computer. Do not use spaces in the folder name. Ensure that you’re using the studio edition of Oracle JDeveloper 12c (12.1.2.0.0) or later, available as a free download on Oracle Technology Network.
Static, Dynamic, Multiple
The multi-task-flow binding feature is a combination of the static and dynamic task-flow-binding types used in Oracle JDeveloper to associate region content with the Oracle ADF binding layer and lifecycle.
A static region uses a dedicated task flow binding added to the PageDef.xml file of the parent page to associate the region content with a bounded task flow. The task flow binding contains a static reference to the bounded task flow to be exposed in the region.
Dynamic regions also use a dedicated task flow binding, which uses a property reference to a managed bean in view scope to provide the task flow reference information. The managed bean is accessible from Java code and through expression language (EL). The task flow reference returned by the managed bean property can be changed at runtime for the region to display the contents of different task flows sequentially.
In multi-task-flow binding, the multi-TaskFlow binding element provides the region component model for multiple Oracle ADF region instances that are created at runtime with the af:forEach loop tag of the Oracle ADF Faces feature of Oracle ADF. Each region obtains its bounded task flow configuration reference from a managed bean. As with dynamic regions, the content of the managed bean can be changed at runtime, thereby enabling the display at runtime of an unknown-at-design-time number of task flows in regions. The region binding is appropriate for uses such as dashboards that display varying numbers of bounded task flows on a page. Read the complete article here.

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