Posts Tagged ‘c2b2’

 

clip_image001These are best practices from our experience working on supporting and building large scale production middleware environments

1) Don’t get your Developers to Build your Production Configuration

Despite the term "devops" don’t get the devs to build the ops environment. Now we are all in favour of the agility and mindset of devops, like continuous delivery (see our other best practices), that arises from embracing devops principles but some devs assume devops mean they deliver production infrastructure. This is usually a bad thing as most developers do not have the expertise in creating best practice middleware configurations tuned for HA, Scalability, Security and Performance. Most middleware products "out of the box" are configured for ease of development so devs can get started easily and quickly in building cool stuff. They aren’t configured out of the box for production. Devs don’t have the time (or often the inclination) to track feature updates in minor releases, patch sets or critical security and bug fixes. It’s the job of the ops team to track all these things and define a standard operational build of your middleware infrastructure which devs can deploy to.

2) Put in place in-depth historical Middleware and JVM monitoring

Many of our new customers just don’t have adequate historical monitoring of their middleware infrastructure. Sure they have Nagios or some equivalent monitoring networks, cpu, disk usage, swap etc. but they rarely have anything monitoring JVM stats, Connection pool sizes, JMS queue back logs, JVM thread usage etc… all critical things in a Java middleware environment. Key metrics should be monitored, stored and be available for triage, diagnosis and capacity planning. Even better put in place a full Application Performance Management tool to deep dive into the Java code and JDBC layers. Once in place configure appropriate alerts so action can be taken before an outage. Without these things it is likely your customers will be the first people to notice an outage in the middleware.

3) Ensure Scripted and versioned Installation, Configuration and Deployment

Always script initial creation of your middleware environments and get the developers to script their application deployments. In fact script all changes to your middleware and also ensure you have roll back scripts to reverse the changes you just made. Put those scripts into configuration management and label them and manage them as you would any software product. Once you’ve done this you can rapidly create new production and test environments you can force your developers to really get devops and build applications that can be deployed without hours of manual steps. It removes human error, creates repeatability and aids agility it is generally a good thing. Read the complete article here.

WebLogic Partner Community

For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

Blog Twitter LinkedIn Forum Wiki

 

clip_image001GlassFish 4.1 was released a couple of months ago now, bringing with it a large number of welcome bug fixes and improvements. As the Payara Open Source project was born from it, it would be remiss of us not give all of you who maintain an interest in GlassFish a brief overview of some of the things that have changed or been updated since 4.0. Among these changes, the minimum JDK version required is now 7 Update 65, or 8 Update 20, so you’ll need to update if you intend to use it with anything less; it likely just won’t start otherwise!

Updated Platforms and Specifications

As you might expect from any major update to an application server (even if it is just a minor point release), and particularly since GlassFish still holds itself as the Java EE reference application server, there is now support for more recent platforms and Java EE specifications.

Java SE 8

Arguably the headline new feature, GlassFish 4.1 now supports Java SE 8, bringing it up to date with the latest Java specifications. This brings with it all of the new features available in Java 8, such as Lambda expressions, a brand new Date and Time API, and concurrent accumulator classes. There’s quite a stir around the introduction of Lambda expressions, and how it adds some functional programming “oomph” to the Java language.

PermGen No More? Read the complete article here

WebLogic Partner Community

For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

Blog Twitter LinkedIn Forum Wiki

clip_image001We are at JavaOne 2014 and one of the key reasons for me to attend was to catch up on the future of GlassFish. So on Sunday I went along to the GlassFish community update at the Moscone Center to consult with the Oracle on the future of GlassFish.
The reason I go to JavaOne is to hear the definitive view on GlassFish and JavaEE futures from the people that make the decisions. There’s no other conference you can say that about.
On the stand there were 4 Oracle guys who make the decisions on GlassFish.
John Clingan – Product Manager for JavaEE and GlassFish; Mike Lehman – Product Manager for Cloud Application Framework; Cameron Purdy – VP Development; Reza Rahman – Evangelist for JavaEE and GlassFish.
What I saw was that there is a roadmap for GlassFish out until JavaOne 2016 as JavaEE8 develops with GlassFish 5 being the reference implementation for JavaEE 8. GlassFish 5 will aim to be released as the final draft for JavaEE 8 hit the JCP.
Cameron spoke about GlassFish being a key Research and Development platform with much of the technology created in GlassFish to support the JavaEE specifications finding its way into WebLogic with GlassFish having a key role in the evolution of JavaEE far into the future. Many of the key JavaEE specification developers are working on GlassFish as part of their JSR work and that is a huge investment.
John reiterated that Quality, stability and security are still important. The team continue to work to ensure that GlassFish passes all the JSR Compatibility Test Suites and any issues will be fixed. In fact the key priorities for the recent 4.1 release were Java 8 support, stability and quality. Also much of the work invested into GlassFish for JavaEE 8 support will be shareable with WebLogic. Read the complete article here.

WebLogic Partner Community

For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

Blog Twitter LinkedIn Forum Wiki

Last November after the announcement by Oracle that no future release beyond the 3.x version of GlassFish would have support from Oracle there were a lot of doom and gloom articles about GlassFish. I tried to put my view that this probably wasn’t the end of GlassFish but time would tell.

Why we need a Strong GlassFish
As the founder of a company that is vendor independent. I think it is imperative for the Java EE community that there is a strong vibrant GlassFish server. Having GlassFish out there as a viable production open source Java EE server drives competition. Competition drives innovation in competing products. Competition drives quality in competing products. Competition drives adoption through visibility and choice. If GlassFish fades then I’m afraid that the whole of Java EE fades. There will be no competitive incentive to drive innovation in WildFly, although I’m sure the RedHat engineers wouldn’t consciously drive down innovation and quality but competition naturally keeps them lean, mean and fast. If GlassFish in the future fails to deliver a good out of the box experience for Java EE 8 and beyond due to poor quality or poor performance then future Java EE adoption as a whole is threatened. This threatens Oracle WebLogic, RedHat JBoss EAP, IBM WebSphere sales as where are the developers to choose the big beasts for production?

Optimism for the Future

Over 6 months have passed and I’ve been trying to take stock of where we are. I’ve recently hosted a community Community Q&A session with Reza Rahman and the London GlassFish User Group and organised a BOF at Devoxx UK with David Delabassee to get the community involved in what is happening with GlassFish. We’ve watched the code archives and started our own builds. Read the complete article here.

 

WebLogic Partner Community

For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

Blog Twitter LinkedIn Mix Forum Wiki

C2B2’s WebLogic As a Service GCloud offering gives you a fully supported; fully managed WebLogic 11g or WebLogic 12c instance on the Amazon EC2 cloud.

We provide you with full administration access to your WebLogic instance to deploy any applications you wish. We provide full 24/7 operational support for your WebLogic instance and application helping you with triage, diagnosis and fix of production issues which are impacting your service. We can provide you with a single WebLogic for development purposes, a dual node cluster for High Availability or clusters of larger size for more demanding applications.

WebLogic provides a complete Java EE5 or JavaEE6 environment for deploying your Java EE applications.
WebLogic As a Service is suitable for on-demand development environments; test environments and fully highly available production deployments. It is especially suitable for organisations that have Java EE applications to deploy and don’t have the WebLogic administration and operational support experience in-house. Our WebLogic As a Service offering is deployed to the Amazon EC2 public cloud hosted in Ireland and fully managed by C2B2 an Amazon AWS Partner.

Key Features:

  • 24/7 Incident Support via Web/eMail/Remote/Screen Sharing
  • Multiple WebLogic instance sizes to choose from
  • Managed Operating System and WebLogic patching
  • Full Administration Access to the WebLogic Console
  • Full deployment access to WebLogic
  • WLST access
  • Optional separate domain controller
  • Clustered Option across multiple availability zones for high availability
  • Large clusters supported
  • Various Database options if required

Get more details here.

WebLogic Partner Community

For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

Blog Twitter LinkedIn Mix Forum Wiki

C2B2 provides a full suite of professional consultancy services to support the deployment of our GlassFish As A Service cloud offerings or the deployment of GlassFish on private, public or hybrid clouds.

Architect & Design

For infrastructure projects a thorough understanding of the cloud and middleware infrastructure is essential for effective architecture and design. We have in depth, real world experience of Java Enterprise middleware both in the cloud and the company data centre.

Approach

We can deliver our services through a range of engagement types including:

  • Workshops with the technical team and key stakeholders
  • Informal whiteboard sessions
  • Architecture and design documents using UML
  • Training and coaching

An architecture and design engagement typically covers:

  • Architecture goals and constraints
  • Architecture styles and patterns
  • Guiding principles
  • Selection of products and technologies
  • Identification of key interfaces and communication protocols
  • Various system views (functional, technical, use case, deployment etc)
  • Scalability plan
  • Non functional test approach
  • Skill requirements

Get all details about C2B2 Glassfish services here.

WebLogic Partner Community

For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

Blog Twitter LinkedIn Mix Forum Wiki

This blog directly follows on from part 2 on watches, so if you haven’t already read that then you should probably go and do that now. You can still create notifications without having any watches configured; you just won’t receive anything on them. In the last post, I had created two watches, one Server Log watch and one Collected Metrics watch. In this post, I will create notifications to work with these watches.

What are notifications?
WLDF notifications are nothing more than a particular configuration for alerting based on a condition. Think of them as channels of communication; unless something is sent down those channels, they will stay empty. The forms that these channels can take are:

  • SMTP Email
  • JMS Message
  • Diagnostic Image
  • JMX Notification
  • SNMP Trap

Which notification should I use?
There’s no right or wrong when it comes to choosing notification methods, but there is certainly annoying and non-annoying! Of the notification methods above, all but email are passive methods of alerting people concerned. The reason I classify them as passive is that you, as the end-user who wants to be notified, must perform some sort of action to consume that notification. For example, to consume JMS message data, you must use a JMS client and would likely process the data automatically, perhaps for graphing. Read the complete article here.

WebLogic Partner Community

For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

Blog Twitter LinkedIn Mix Forum Wiki