Archive for the ‘WebLogic’ Category

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In a previous post, we talked about automating the installation of fusion middleware binaries. Now let’s review how we can create ADF Domain using scripts. This process will create single node domain, but you can extend it to meet your needs.

You can download necessary scripts from HERE.

If you are on Windows use createDomain.bat and for Unix use createDomain.sh. Both scripts have variables defined in first 21 lines, modify them according to your requirements before execution. Read the complete article here.

WebLogic Partner Community

For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Technorati Tags: PaaS,Cloud,Middleware Update,WebLogic, WebLogic Community,Oracle,OPN,Jürgen Kress

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Is an Australian beach the perfect location for a 2 Minute Tech Tip on updating/upgrading production environments and deploying applications using the Zero Downtime feature in Oracle WebLogic? You be the judge.

Watch the video here.

WebLogic Partner Community

For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Technorati Tags: PaaS,Cloud,Middleware Update,WebLogic, WebLogic Community,Oracle,OPN,Jürgen Kress

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Introduction

The high availability of applications in the WebLogic environment is realized by clustering. Managed servers in the cluster work together. The information about transactions is distributed cluster-wide. If a cluster member fails, another server takes over the tasks of the failed server and executes them. In this way, the applications are kept running without interruption.

The AdminServer is a single point of failure: if the server fails, the Domain is no longer administrable:

– Configuration changes cannot be performed

– The administration console is not available

The managed servers are still running and can continue to work, even if the AdminServer is not available: this requires the activation of MSI (Managed Server Independence) Mode.

How can the AdminSevrer be protected from failure? In this blogpost I will describe all the steps that are necessary to keep your server running safely.

Environment Overview

My domain consists of two managed servers and an AdminServer. Managed servers are grouped into a Cluster. The environment is installed on two Linux servers based on VMWare: Read the complete article here.

WebLogic Partner Community

For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Technorati Tags: PaaS,Cloud,Middleware Update,WebLogic, WebLogic Community,Oracle,OPN,Jürgen Kress

 

You’ve read a buimagench of online tutorials and you’ve managed to containerize your application. You have even exposed a port so you can reach the application from the outside world, but when you connect, you’re greeted with an error page: "Cannot connect to the database". It’s time to start debugging! Below you will find some methods for debugging containers, as well as some information about the crashcart tool we have developed at Oracle to make debugging easier.

Related content

· Running Docker Store images on Container Cloud Service

· Containers, Containers Everywhere But Not a Drop to Drink!

Debugging Strategies

Containers can be a challenge to debug, especially when you are a little fuzzy on exactly what a container is and how it works. Some people treat containers like miniature vms, and go so far as to run an ssh daemon inside their container so that they can login when things go crazy. Others stick a bunch of useful tools inside their container and use `docker exec` to get a shell inside their container. But for those of us with slightly-more-sane operational practices, what do we do when things go wrong? Read the complete article here.

WebLogic Partner Community

For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Technorati Tags: PaaS,Cloud,Middleware Update,WebLogic, WebLogic Community,Oracle,OPN,Jürgen Kress

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TL;DR I will show you that the MedRec sample application for WebLogic can be used for deploying Java artifacts and configuring WebLogic resources on first boot of a WebLogic Docker image. We can do this with a 5 line Dockerfile and a medrec.py script which customises the WebLogic domain. This example is available to play with on Github at this link.

In previous blogs, we showed how to run WebLogic with Java Applications on Docker both locally and on Oracle Container Cloud Service. We achieved this by extending the official WebLogic image from Oracle Container Registry either directly or by linking up the WebLogic autodeploy directory from another container to deploy our applications.

In this article we are going to:

· Discuss what the official WebLogic image does on first-boot followed by options for configuring custom WebLogic resources in a WebLogic Docker Container at the first-boot stage.

· Show an end-to-end example of Application Deployment and WebLogic Configuration using the MedRec Sample Application running on WebLogic in a Docker container

· Discuss the drawbacks of data that is managed outside of containers. We will show that we can specifically seed the data for the MedRec application outside Docker and discuss how it could be improved to better suit the Docker deployment models. Read the complete article here.

WebLogic Partner Community

For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Technorati Tags: PaaS,Cloud,Middleware Update,WebLogic, WebLogic Community,Oracle,OPN,Jürgen Kress

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In an earlier article, I discussed the creation of a generic Docker Container Image that runs any Node.JS application based on sources for that application on GitHub. When the container is started, the GitHub URL is passed in as a parameter and the container will download the sources and run the application. Using this generic image, you can your Node application everywhere you can run a Docker container. One of the places where you can run a Docker Container is the Oracle Container Cloud Service (OCCS) – a service that offers a platform for managing your container landscape. In this article, I will show how I used OCCS to run my generic Docker image for running Node application and how I configured the service to run a specific Node application from GitHub.

Getting started with OCCS is described very well in an article by my colleague Luc Gorissen on this same blog: Docker, WebLogic Image on Oracle Container Cloud Service. I used his article to get started myself.

The steps are:

  • create OCCS Service instance
  • configure OCCS instance (with Docker container image registry)
  • Create a Service for the desired container image (the generic Node application runner) – this includes configuring the Docker container parameters such as port mapping and environment variables
  • Deploy the Service (run a container instance)
  • Check the deployment (status, logs, assigned public IP)
  • Test the deployment – check if the Node application is indeed available
Create OCCS Service instance

Assuming you have an Oracle Public Cloud account with a subscription to OCCS. Go to the Dashboard for OCCS. Click on Create Service. Read the complete article here.

WebLogic Partner Community

For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Technorati Tags: PaaS,Cloud,Middleware Update,WebLogic, WebLogic Community,Oracle,OPN,Jürgen Kress

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Two of my favorite Oracle Cloud services are the Exadata Express Cloud Service (Exadata Express) and the Application Container Cloud Service (ACCS). Exadata Express is a fully managed Oracle Database service at an entry-level price point for small to medium sized data and ACCS is an easy way to deploy apps in Docker containers. In this post, I’ll demonstrate how to connect these two services at the most basic level.
What do I mean by “the most basic level”? First, I’m not going to demonstrate how to create an Oracle Cloud account with these two services – I’ll assume you’ve already done that. Also, the demo app in this post will be minimalistic. Normally, I might use the Developer Cloud Service to create a Git repo with an automated build process – not here. This post will focus only on what’s needed to get these two services connected.

Contents:

Create test app

Create a new directory named connection-test-app and add the following two files. Read the complete article here.

WebLogic Partner Community

For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

Blog Twitter LinkedIn Forum Wiki

Technorati Tags: PaaS,Cloud,Middleware Update,WebLogic, WebLogic Community,Oracle,OPN,Jürgen Kress