Archive for the ‘WebLogic’ Category

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In case you have multiple Oracle WebLogic Server Domains on one Server running, you might realise the following problem:
Opening 2 or more WebLogic Consoles in one Browser and switching the Browser tabs between the different WebLogic Consoles, you have to re-login all the times for your different WebLogic Consoles. This is really annoying …
The problem behind is really simple, its the WebLogic Admin Console Cookie, as for all Oracle WebLogic Admin Consoles the default Cookie Name is identical, its named "ADMINCONSOLESESSION".
In order to avoid this permanent re-login to your multiple WebLogic Admin Consoles, you simply have to configure for each Oracle WebLogic Server Domain running on the same server unique Cookie Names.
I prefer the following naming convention: Cookie Name = Domain Name.
Open your WebLogic Admin Console and navigate to the Domain Configuration. Read the complete article here.

WebLogic Partner Community

For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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imageOracle provides the Dynamic Monitoring Service (DMS) as part of WebLogic Server which is extremely useful if you want to obtain aggregated data of an environment in case of for example a performance test. The data which can be obtained from DMS is extensive. This varies from average duration of service calls to JVM garbage collects to datasource statistics. DMS can be queried with WLST. See for example here. On example script based on this can be found here. You can also directly go to a web-interface such as: http://<host&gt;:<port>/dms/Spy. The DMS Spy servlet is by default only enabled on development environments but can be deployed on production environments (see here).

Obtaining data from DMS in an automated fashion, even with the WLST support, can be a challenge. In this blog I provide a Python 2.7 script which allows you to get information from the DMS and dump it in a CSV file for further processing. The script first logs and uses the obtained session information to download information from a specific table in XML. This XML is converted to CSV. The code does not require an Oracle Home (it is not WLST based). The purpose here is to provide an easy to use starting point which can be expanded to suit specific use-cases. The script works against WebLogic 11g and 12c environments (has been tested against 11.1.1.7 and 12.2.1). Do mind that the example URL given in the script obtains performance data on webservice operations. This works great on composites but not on Service Bus or JAX-WS services. You can download a general script here (which requires minimal changes to use) and a (more specific) script with examples of how to preprocess data in the script here.

How to work with the DMS

The dynamic contents of the DMS tables (like average service response times) are reset upon server restart. Static contents such as deployed composites, remain comparable even after a restart. The contents can also be reset by a script. See for example here. An easy way to work with the DMS is to first reset it, perform some tests and then collect data. After collecting data, you can again reset it and start with a next test. Read the complete article here.

WebLogic Partner Community

For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Technorati Tags: WebLogic Community,Oracle,OPN,Jürgen Kress

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The RESTFul Management Services within Oracle WebLogic 12c is one of the greatest features and my personal favorite.
You can achieve a lot of things with the RESTFul Management Services, like creating DataSources, perform deployments, startup and shutdown Managed Servers and so on.
But you also can access the different WebLogic Server Logfiles 🙂
Let’s say your developers needs access to the Logfiles of your Oracle WebLogic Server, but you don’t want to give them access to your Server which is hosting your Oracle WebLogic Server.
Just create a new User in your WebLogic Admin Console and give this new User the Group "Monitor". With the Monitor Group you can access the WebLogic RESTFul Management Services.
Now your developers can retrieve the Logfiles with a simple cURL command from their desktops: Read the complete article here.

WebLogic Partner Community

For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Technorati Tags: WebLogic Community,Oracle,OPN,Jürgen Kress

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Introduction

This post describes the installation of the WebLogic Server Version 12.2.1.2.0

The following tasks are performed and described:

· Preparing the Operating System for the installation of the WebLogic Server 12.2.1.2

· Installation JDK 1.8 and the WebLogic Server 12.2.1.2

The installation will be proceeding on the Oracle Enterprise Linux 7.2: host03.example.com

Pre-installation Tasks

This chapter describes some tasks of preparation for the Operating System and the Database.

For more information please refer to the document System requirements and Specifications

Install and configure the database

The WebLogic Server needs a preinstalled database. Please create a database and configure it according to documentation System requirements and Specifications, chapter 1.5.2

Database version is:

· Equal to or higher than 11.2.0.4 for 11g Release 2 databases

· Equal to or higher than 12.1.0.1 for 12c databases

Character set: AL32UTF8

Parameter (Minimum Required Value): Read the complete article here.

WebLogic Partner Community

For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Technorati Tags: WebLogic Community,Oracle,OPN,Jürgen Kress

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Introduction

This post describes the installation of the WebLogic Server Version 12.2.1.2.0

The following tasks are performed and described:

· Preparing the Operating System for the installation of the WebLogic Server 12.2.1.2

· Installation JDK 1.8 and the WebLogic Server 12.2.1.2

The installation will be proceeding on the Oracle Enterprise Linux 7.2: host03.example.com

Pre-installation Tasks

This chapter describes some tasks of preparation for the Operating System and the Database.

For more information please refer to the document System requirements and Specifications

Install and configure the database

The WebLogic Server needs a preinstalled database. Please create a database and configure it according to documentation System requirements and Specifications, chapter 1.5.2

Database version is:

· Equal to or higher than 11.2.0.4 for 11g Release 2 databases

· Equal to or higher than 12.1.0.1 for 12c databases

Character set: AL32UTF8

Parameter (Minimum Required Value): Read the complete article here.

WebLogic Partner Community

For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Technorati Tags: WebLogic Community,Oracle,OPN,Jürgen Kress

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In a recent article, I shared my first steps (small step for mankind, big steps for me) with Oracle Management Cloud: First steps with Oracle Management Cloud – Application Performance Management for Node (JS) applications. In that article, I have explained in broad terms the purpose of Application Performance Monitoring in the scope of OMC:

Application Performance Monitoring (APM) is clearly indispensable to any organization adopting a DevOps approach – and frankly required for any organization in general running applications to support business objectives. APM provides insight in the non-functional behavior of applications – or better yet: of the business functions provided by these applications. It alerts administrators to functions that have unacceptable response times or are at risk to display poor performance and it allows us to analyze these situations to figure out where in the application stack – front end, services, integration flows, database, etc. – and in which specific component the problems have arisen. After performing this type of root cause analysis, resolving the problem still needs to be done, but is kick started as early as possible and with as much analysis details as possible.

In that earlier article, I also demonstrated how monitoring can be set up for Node (JS) applications. In this article, I will work with the APM Java agent. This agent can be installed and configured for a range of Java EE application servers – including Oracle WebLogic Server, Apache Tomcat Server, JBoss/WildFly, IBM WebSphere Server. It will observe the activity in the JVM and derive meaningful metrics from its observations. These metrics are forwarded to the OMC cloud where they are stored, processed, visualized and analyzed.

In this article I will apply the APM Java Agent to an existing Oracle WebLogic plus SOA Suite environment. After installing and configuring the agent, I have to make one small change to the WebLogic startup script, (re)start the server and subsequently and activity on that server is reported to OMC and exposed in the APM Dashboard and analysis screens. Subsequently my colleague executed the same steps on his personal laptop, using an agent with the same registration key and applying this agent to a WebLogic Server running an ADF application against a local database. Within minutes, the metrics from his machine and his ADF application appeared in the APM section of OMC, ready to be analyzed. (this particular ADF application is intentionally equipped with a number of performance black holes, for training and demonstration purposes; OMC APM was capable of identifying most of them. Read the complete article here.

WebLogic Partner Community

For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Technorati Tags: WebLogic Community,Oracle,OPN,Jürgen Kress

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A few days back, we at AMIS got our cloud trial for Oracle Management Cloud. I can now report from my first steps with Application Performance Monitoring, one of the key components of OMC. Application Performance Monitoring (APM) is clearly indispensable to any organization adopting a DevOps approach – and frankly required for any organization in general running applications to support business objectives. APM provides insight in the non-functional behavior of applications – or better yet: of the business functions provided by these applications. It alerts administrators to functions that have unacceptable response times or are at risk to display poor performance and it allows us to analyze these situations to figure out where in the application stack – front end, services, integration flows, database, etc. – and in which specific component the problems have arisen. After performing this type of root cause analysis, resolving the problem still needs to be done, but is kick started as early as possible and with as much analysis details as possible.

In this article, I will describe the very practical steps I took to go from having my trial provisioned to having my first application monitored in the dashboards of APM. At this point I will not yet have very compelling analyses to describe – but I do have a dashboard and my first alerts sent to me.

This picture visualizes my set up: a local Node.js environment on my laptop, running an application that responds a HTTP requests by serving up an Oracle JET application with all of its resources (static JS libraries, CSS files, images etc). The Node.js server is configured for oracle-apm as is this particular Node.js application. When the application is running, the APM agent is activated. The agent gathers details and metrics – and sends these details to the Oracle Management Cloud environment. Here, these details are collected, stored and processed. They can be visualized in a dashboard, used for analysis and for example lead to automated alerts when specified alert conditions are identified. Read the complete article here.

WebLogic Partner Community

For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Technorati Tags: WebLogic Community,Oracle,OPN,Jürgen Kress