Archive for the ‘Cloud’ Category

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When your Oracle Mobile Cloud Service APIs are being accessed by a remote server, it is important you manage cross-origin resource sharing (CORS) We ran into this issue when we were building the solution for the Oracle cloud day. The MCS APIs were accessed by a Web Application that was hosted on a different domain, not on our Oracle PaaS domain. When calling an API from the application, we received the error:
XMLHttpRequest cannot load: [request url]. Response to preflight request doesn’t pass access control check: No ‘Access-Control-Allow-Origin’ header is present on the requested resource. Origin [origin domain] is therefore not allowed access. The response had HTTP status 401.
You can either disallow CORS altogether, or whitelist specific sites.  This is done by setting a property in policies.properties: Security_AllowOrigin.
An example of the property can be seen below: Read the complete article here.

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Thanks to Oracle A-Team, I had a chance to work with Chatbots.
3 pure NodeJS applications, on couple of Oracle Cloud platforms and Facebook messenger, and my chatbot was running.
Let me explain, the architecture a bit. To start with, following is the simple representation of how it works.

Message Platform Server : Is a NodeJS application, deployed on Oracle Application Container cloud, acts as a channel between Facebook Messenger and the chatbot engine. It simply converts the incoming messages from Facebook and sends it to chatbot readable format. Also, when chatbot replies, it converts to Facebook readable formats and passes it to messenger.
Chatbot Engine : Is a NodeJS application, which communicate with some REST APIs based on a conversation flow document and moves the flow of the conversation from one state to another.
Flow JSON : Where we document, every state of a conversation and which APIs to call to generate a response. For example, at the beginning of the conversation, start from "menu" state, and call "/start" API. The flow metadata file is driving the behavior of the bot engine.  The bot engine uses a finite-state-machine (FSM) to drive the conversation. Every step in the conversation is modeled as a state, and all possible next steps to move the conversation to a next state are defined as state transitions.  Every time a state is entered, the response elements defined for this state in the flow metadata are processed and the response is constructed and returned to the messaging platform. Read the complete article here.

WebLogic Partner Community

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When you need to extend your SaaS application you may use PaaS solutions to do it!
In this blog post I will use Oracle Mobile Cloud Service (MCS) and Oracle Mobile Application Accelerator (MAX) to create a mobile application for my Oracle Sales Cloud.
Download the packages: paas4saas-with-mcs-and-max.zip.

First of all we need to create a new Mobile Backend.
Go to Menu > Applications > Mobile Backends.
Click “New Mobile Backend” button to create a new Mobile Backend and name it as SalesMB.

To create a new Connector, go to Menu > Applications > Connectors.
Click “New Connector” button to create a new SOAP Connector and name it as SalesConn.
Don’t forget to provide the WSDL of ContactService. Read the complete article here.

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In a recent article, I shared my first steps (small step for mankind, big steps for me) with Oracle Management Cloud: First steps with Oracle Management Cloud – Application Performance Management for Node (JS) applications. In that article, I have explained in broad terms the purpose of Application Performance Monitoring in the scope of OMC:

Application Performance Monitoring (APM) is clearly indispensable to any organization adopting a DevOps approach – and frankly required for any organization in general running applications to support business objectives. APM provides insight in the non-functional behavior of applications – or better yet: of the business functions provided by these applications. It alerts administrators to functions that have unacceptable response times or are at risk to display poor performance and it allows us to analyze these situations to figure out where in the application stack – front end, services, integration flows, database, etc. – and in which specific component the problems have arisen. After performing this type of root cause analysis, resolving the problem still needs to be done, but is kick started as early as possible and with as much analysis details as possible.

In that earlier article, I also demonstrated how monitoring can be set up for Node (JS) applications. In this article, I will work with the APM Java agent. This agent can be installed and configured for a range of Java EE application servers – including Oracle WebLogic Server, Apache Tomcat Server, JBoss/WildFly, IBM WebSphere Server. It will observe the activity in the JVM and derive meaningful metrics from its observations. These metrics are forwarded to the OMC cloud where they are stored, processed, visualized and analyzed.

In this article I will apply the APM Java Agent to an existing Oracle WebLogic plus SOA Suite environment. After installing and configuring the agent, I have to make one small change to the WebLogic startup script, (re)start the server and subsequently and activity on that server is reported to OMC and exposed in the APM Dashboard and analysis screens. Subsequently my colleague executed the same steps on his personal laptop, using an agent with the same registration key and applying this agent to a WebLogic Server running an ADF application against a local database. Within minutes, the metrics from his machine and his ADF application appeared in the APM section of OMC, ready to be analyzed. (this particular ADF application is intentionally equipped with a number of performance black holes, for training and demonstration purposes; OMC APM was capable of identifying most of them. Read the complete article here.

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Watch Thomas Kurian, President of Product Development at Oracle and Mike Lehmann, Vice President of Product Management, demonstrate how to build, deploy and manage applications using an agile DevOps strategy and Oracle Management Cloud

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A few days back, we at AMIS got our cloud trial for Oracle Management Cloud. I can now report from my first steps with Application Performance Monitoring, one of the key components of OMC. Application Performance Monitoring (APM) is clearly indispensable to any organization adopting a DevOps approach – and frankly required for any organization in general running applications to support business objectives. APM provides insight in the non-functional behavior of applications – or better yet: of the business functions provided by these applications. It alerts administrators to functions that have unacceptable response times or are at risk to display poor performance and it allows us to analyze these situations to figure out where in the application stack – front end, services, integration flows, database, etc. – and in which specific component the problems have arisen. After performing this type of root cause analysis, resolving the problem still needs to be done, but is kick started as early as possible and with as much analysis details as possible.

In this article, I will describe the very practical steps I took to go from having my trial provisioned to having my first application monitored in the dashboards of APM. At this point I will not yet have very compelling analyses to describe – but I do have a dashboard and my first alerts sent to me.

This picture visualizes my set up: a local Node.js environment on my laptop, running an application that responds a HTTP requests by serving up an Oracle JET application with all of its resources (static JS libraries, CSS files, images etc). The Node.js server is configured for oracle-apm as is this particular Node.js application. When the application is running, the APM agent is activated. The agent gathers details and metrics – and sends these details to the Oracle Management Cloud environment. Here, these details are collected, stored and processed. They can be visualized in a dashboard, used for analysis and for example lead to automated alerts when specified alert conditions are identified. Read the complete article here.

WebLogic Partner Community

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Docker has undergone a dramatic evolution in only the last couple of years. From virtually unknown in 2014, it still seemed to be a exotic, niche open source solution when WebLogic was certified on Docker in early 2015.

Nowadays this is different. End of 2016 it has become very common to explore new software by just running an official Docker image from Docker hub. CI / CD pipelines are often built on Docker for repeatability. Docker is one of the key building blocks for runtime environments of those wandering down the microservices alley.

However, you need much more than just a starting a Docker container or two. You need infrastructure, networking, private and public registries, containers have to be scaled and restarted if they fail. All this needs to be installed, configured, and operated. On premises this is not an easy task.

There is a huge difference between spinning up a Docker container and operating a Kubernetes cluster for enterprise critical applications 24/7 in production. So the the obvious choice is often the cloud with a PaaS based container cloud service. Watch the video here.

WebLogic Partner Community

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Technorati Tags: WebLogic Community,Oracle,OPN,Jürgen Kress