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Lately we implemented a Single Sign On solution for Apex, based on Weblogic 12cR2, ORDS 3.0.9, and ADFS as a federated Identity Provider. This combination turns out to be a marriage of 3 different worlds. So we ran in to a several issues that were not described in one simple how-to document. So in this document I try to assemble the information needed to do the end 2 end configuration (apart from the OHS configuration).
For most of the SAML2 configuration on Weblogic, we could have my earlier article  on SAML2.0 on Weblogic 11g, as a guide: Service Provider initiated SSO on WLS11g using SAML2.0 .
This helped a great deal with regards to ADFS and 12c. The rest of the issues I’d like to cover here, for future reference.

ORDS

ORDS can be installed in the regular way. I downloaded ORDS and unzipped it in the weblogic domain home. Then I did the setup using: Read the complete article here.

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Several Weblogic components like EJBs, Datasources and Queues are accessed using JNDI-lookups. In default Weblogic configurations, the JNDI-Tree can be accessed without any kind of authentication. This is far from ideal, because any process, inside or outside the Weblogic container is capable of invoking these components. Only Datasources have an extra layer of security and can only be used remotely by activating the property “weblogic.jdbc.remoteEnabled”.

In this blog entry I will not only show how to secure the JNDI-Tree but also what this means to the development of components such as Session EJBs, Message Driven Beans and external frameworks.

1. Securing the JNDI-Tree lookups

In Weblogic it is possible to secure single JNDI addresses, a group of addresses and the whole JNDI-Tree. There are two ways to do this: the administration console and with WLST

1.1 Administration Console

  • In Environment->Servers-> admin_server-> View JNDI Tree

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After playing around with the CLI it’s time to run some instance on the Oracle Compute Cloud Service. Oracle offers a broad range of images divided in 3 categories namely: Oracle images, Private images and Marketplace. The marketplace holds almost 400 turn-key solutions (from PeopleSoft to WordPress) where the category Oracle images are mostly Oracle Enterprise Linux distributions.

For this blog I will start a Oracle Linux 7.2 machine on the Oracle Compute Cloud and connect through SSH from my own machine.

Setting up security (SSH)

First we need to create a private and public keypair to authenticate against the Linux instance. Where the private key is safely stored on my desktop, the public key will be uploaded to the Oracle Compute Cloud. Run the following command: Read the complete article here.

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The "Live For The Code" Keynote in London, 20th April 2018 is available:

The sample code from the slideless keynote was pushed to: https://github.com/AdamBien/live4code — expect commits during upcoming keynotes.

See you in Berlin. I decided to continue with the implementation of the serverless microservice :-). Watch the video here.

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In my last post I gave an introduction to Oracle Application Container Cloud (ACC) and how to develop Spring-Boot applications such that they can be hosted within Oracle ACC. At the end of the post some questions still had to be answered. Within this post we are going to tackle the first one, how is Microservice Communication in Oracle Application Container Cloud achieved? The following figure shows what a simple architecture, within the context of a Spring-Boot Microservice application, might look like

Basic Microservice Architecture

As one can see within the architecture diagram the deployment consists of three services. The first service is a simple Spring-Boot service registry. The service registry can be easily implemented using Spring-Cloud Eureka integration. Eureka is a service registry provided within Netflix OSS. All other services should be able to register themselves with the registry server and retrieve all information required for calling other services. Secondly, Microservice 1 could be a simple service publishing its data and only interacting with the service registry. Lastly, Microservice 2 would be another service which provides data but enhances it by retrieving additional information from Microservice 1.

Unfortunately, within Oracle ACC using a simple service registry is not that simple. When using Eureka as registry, clients only seem to have access to their local hostname configuration (see listing below). Read the complete article here.

The October issue of the PaaS & Middleware Partner Update is an update from Oracle OpenWorld 2017:

• PaaS announcements

• PaaS innovation including AI and blockchain

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In posts one and two within this series we created and deployed Spring-Boot Microservices in Oracle’s Application Container Cloud Service (ACC). Usually, after deploying an application and enabling user traffic an application must be monitored to ensure a high level of service and identify approaching problems. This blog post describes how monitoring in Oracle Application Container Cloud can be achieved using standard features.  The focus will be on Java applications.

Accessing Monitoring Information using Service Console

The simplest indication regarding application health can be retrieved directly within Oracle ACC service console. After opening service console, one must access service overview page to get the application’s average memory usage over all running instances presented. For each application instance an additional indicator is displayed below including a timestamp the metric was captured.

Service Console Metrics

The second application monitoring feature resides within the application’s Administration tab, as it enables an administrator to download application logs. One must click on the Get Log button and Oracle ACC collects  logs from all application instances within the specified time frame. The logs collected are stored on the configured Oracle Storage Cloud Service. After the process is finished all logs can be downloaded from either Storage Cloud or Application Container Cloud service consoles. Read the complete article here.

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