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End of February the DOAG held its annual DevCamp in Bonn, Germany. One big part of the DevCamp was a session or better a couple of session about the Oracle Developer Cloud Service and how to use it.

This part shows some general information about the Oracle Cloud. In the next part we show how to migrate an existing application to the cloud and how to use some of the available tools of the Development cloud.

The Developer Cloud Service (DCS) was introduced last year and became available to the public around the OOW2015. It offers a whole toolset to allow development of applications in the cloud. The DCS is bundled with the Java Cloud Service (JCS) which is bundled with the Database Cloud Service (DBCS). There are a couple of other services like Storage Cloud Service , responsible for managing the disk storage needed, and Compute Cloud Service responsible for the security and firewall of all services used by a company. For more information see Fasten your seat belts: Flying the Oracle Development Cloud Service (1- Boarding).

All these services are working together. If you ever have setup a working Oracle environment consisting of a DB, a WebLogic Server, load balancer, ADF Runtime you know that this isn’t an easy task to accomplish. The good news is that this work is done automatically by Oracle provisioning the different services. You as a user or company have to make some decisions like which version of the DB you want to use, or which version of WebLogic Server to install and how many CPUs to use for each service. You can later upscale the number of CPUs or managed server you want to use in total for your system. All this is very flexible.

Why to use the DCS?

Well, as mentions before, setting up a development environment does take some time and hardware. Sometimes it hard to get the time from your admins to get the hardware and setup the software to get the full environment four your development. This is one reason I see at my customers for not upgrading to newer software versions. The department has to buy the hardware and software licenses, without knowing exactly which hardware parameters they later need. Once the evaluation is finished you have the hardware and software on stock without knowing if you really need them. After all it was an evaluation only. Read the complete article here.

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Introduction

To build functional and performant mobile apps, the back-end data services need to be optimized for mobile consumption. RESTful web services using JSON as payload format are widely considered as the best architectural choice for integration between mobile apps and back-end systems. At the same time, many existing enterprise back-end systems provide a SOAP-based web service application programming interface (API). In this article series we will discuss how Oracle Mobile Cloud Service (MCS) can be used to transform these enterprise system interfaces into a mobile-optimized REST-JSON API. This architecture layer is sometimes referred to as Mobile Backend as a Service (MBaaS). A-Team has been working on a number of projects using MCS to build this architecture layer. We will explain step-by-step how to build an MBaaS, and we will  share tips, lessons learned and best practices we discovered along the way. No prior knowledge of MCS is assumed. In part 1 we discussed the design of the REST API, in part 2 we covered the implementation of the “read” (GET) resources, in part 3 we discussed implementation of the “write” resources (POST,PUT and DELETE). In this fourth part, we will look at how we can use MCS Storage collections to cache payloads, and while doing so, we will use some more advanced concepts like chaining promises to execute multiple REST calls in sequence.

Main Article

In this article we will implement the GET /jobs endpoint which returns a list of jobs. This list is static, and as such can be cached within MCS to reduce the number of backend calls and speed up overall performance. Obviously, app developers can also choose to cache this list on the mobile device to further enhance performance, but that is beyond the scope of this article. We will use the MCS Storage API to store and retrieve the cached list of jobs. We will use a boolean query parameter refreshCache to force an update of the jobs list in storage.

Setting up the Storage Collection

To store files in MCS, a so-called storage collection must be created. Access to a storage collection is handled through roles. When creating a new storage collection, you assign roles that have read and/or write privileges. Users with the appropriate role(s) can then store files in the collection and/or retrieve them. So, we first create a role named HRManager, by clicking on the Mobile User Management menu option, select the Roles tab, and then click on New Role.

After creating the role, we select the Storage menu option and click on New Collection to create the collection. Read the complete article here.

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An usual requirement when working with Oracle Mobile Application Framework and Oracle Mobile Cloud Service is implement the login against Oracle MCS.
In this post I am going to show you how to configure Oracle MCS as an authentication provider in Oracle MAF.
Creating a Realm

A realm is a security context for a ser of users. We can have only one realm for each Mobile Backend, but we can have multiple Mobile Backend using the same realm.

Using one or more realm in MCS will depend on what users we will like to give access to our application.

Under Applications, we can find Mobile User Management. By default there is one realm named ‘default’, but we can create a new one by clicking on ‘New Realm’ button.

In the realm we can find some user information by default altough we can add more properties.

  • Create and configure a Mobile Backend

A Mobile Backend (MBE) is the gateway to Mobile Cloud Service. If we want to access any available resource from MCS, for example an API, we have to do it though an MBE.

We can find Mobile Backends option under Applications menu option.

Click on ‘New Mobile Backend’ to create a new one. Read the complete article here.

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For Oracle Partners free Application Builder Cloud Service (ABCs) online training including certification is available:

Application Builder Cloud Service 2016 Sales Specialist
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The Oracle Mobile Cloud Service team-enablement product management group is happy to announce a new tutorial explaining how to develop with Mobile Application Accelerator (MAX).
In this tutorial you will build a mobile self service application based on the Fix It Fast scenario. The app leverages Oracle Mobile Cloud Service custom APIs, and allows Fix It Fast technicians to login, look at their service requests while on the road, as well as create, view and update incidents.
The "beauty" of MAX is the whole mobile application is built entirely in your browser, and you can easily deploy it straight to your mobile device with a container app, something anybody can do without the hassle of Android Studio, Xcode and other complex mobile programming environments.
We hope you find this tutorial useful in scrubbing up your MAX skills & showing customers how easy it is to use. Believe us when we say an end-to-end app can be built in less than 10 minutes once you’ve run through the tutorial. Get the tutorial here.

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In this video you will see an end to end demonstration of Mobile Application Accelerator (MAX) which will allow you to quickly assemble mobile applications based on REST APIs in Oracle MCS and publish down to a mobile device as a native application. Watch the video here.

WebLogic Partner Community

For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Use the Oracle Mobile Cloud Service Apple iOS SDK to develop mobile apps.

Oracle Mobile Cloud Service is designed to be mobile-client-agnostic, in that it will work with any mobile platform, including Android; Apple iOS; Windows; JavaScript for hybrid mobile solutions; and, of course, Oracle’s own Oracle Mobile Application Framework. The REST APIs published via Oracle Mobile Cloud Service can accept calls from any external mobile client technology that supports HTTP and REST.

But being client-agnostic doesn’t mean that there is no help for mobile developers on the various mobile platforms. Oracle Mobile Cloud Service provides native SDKs for several different mobile platforms. The SDKs are designed to significantly simplify and cut down on the amount of code needed to write raw REST and HTTP native calls to Oracle Mobile Cloud Service, often reducing 50 lines of raw HTTP and REST code for each call down to just 4 or 5 lines with the native SDK.

This article explores Oracle Mobile Cloud Service’s support for the Apple iOS platform to demonstrate how the Oracle Mobile Cloud Service client SDKs make coding native mobile apps easier. The coding approach for the iOS SDK provides a useful introduction to how all the SDKs work. The iOS SDK is written in Apple’s Objective-C, but I’ll show how the iOS SDK supports using Apple’s new Swift programming language.

Getting Ready

This article commences where the previous Oracle Magazine article on Oracle Mobile Cloud Service—“Offloading Mobile Storage”—left off. In the previous article, you created a mobile back end, OraMagTestBackend; two mobile users, joedoe and janeroe, with the same password, Welcome1*; and two storage collections, OraMagSharedCollection and OraMagIsolatedCollection, which you populated with the JSON files joesSharedJsonFile.json and janeSecretJsonFile.json, respectively.

This article shows you how to complete an iOS mobile application written in Swift to enable a mobile user to log in remotely to Oracle Mobile Cloud Service, view the list of objects stored in OraMagSharedCollection, and finally view the contents of each selected object, as shown in Figure 1. The code to do this demonstrates various Oracle Mobile Cloud Service iOS SDK API calls to help you understand how the SDK works.
For the iOS mobile client, you will need an Apple Mac with OS X 10.10+ and Apple Xcode 7.2+ installed. You should also download the Apple Xcode source code for the“ starter application that accompanies this article, unzip the source code archive to your desktop, and open the .xcodeproj file in Xcode. Read the complete article here.

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For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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