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CRUD use case would not be complete without validation logic implementation. Oracle JET allows to implement standard and custom validators on the client. Probably most of the simple to average complexity logic will be implemented in Oracle JET. Complex use cases can be handled in ADF BC validation rules, data will be validated through REST calls. When validation fails in ADF BC, error message is propagated through REST back to Oracle JET client, where we can parse it and attach to the UI field.
You can watch demo video, it shows how it works. I’m trying to update a row with invalid data, rules are executed in ADF BC and validation messages are displayed next to the UI fields in JET:

There are three rules defined in ADF BC. It might be tricky to map UI field with error message. This is easy in case of PATCH method, ADF BC REST returns failed attribute name together with the message. This doesn’t work in the same way with POST method, when new row is created. For this reason, I have introduced custom indicator into each validation message *AttributeName*. I’m parsing this value in JET, to understand which UI field should be marked as incorrect.
Rule 1. Unique Key validation rule for Email attribute.

Rule 2. Hire Date validation rule, it should not be in the future. Read the complete article here.

WebLogic Partner Community

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Last week I had the chance to attend a Mobile Cloud Service 3 days workshop in Madrid. This was the first MCS training in Spain where some partners and I were able to get a good insight about what MCS offers and also a complete hands-on.
If you want to know MCS functionality you can check my previous post: Oracle Mobile Cloud Service overview.

Although I already attended Oracle Summer Camps workshop in Lisbon, we are in the middle of a MCS development and  this workshop was a perfect fit for mastering my MCS skills and also any question we made was perfectly answer by Mireille Duroussaud (Senior Principal Product Manager).
We were also able to see some of the features that will bring the next versions of Mobile Cloud Service like Mobile Application Accelerator (Oracle MAX), and hear of others like for example a JavaScript editor for implementing and debugging APIs right in the browser.

I was really impressed about Oracle MAX becasue building a Mobile Application connected to Mobile Cloud Service was just a matter of 10 minutes. Although the things you can do with Oracle MAX are limitted, it is likely possible that we will be able to donwload the source code of the generated application to extend it wich is a nice feature. Read the complete article here. Want to attend a MCS training close to you? Visit our WebLogic & Developer Community training calendar here (Community membership required).

WebLogic Partner Community

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clip_image001The Oracle IoT Cloud Service is a secure and scalable platform to help organizations quickly build and deploy IoT applications. This new offering allows customers to gain new data-driven insights and drive actions from IoT by connecting, analyzing and integrating device data into business processes and applications like remote equipment monitoring and asset tracking.

The 3 Core Elements of IoT Cloud

Connect – Using IoT Cloud Service, users can collect data from any device in any market—reliably and securely. It abstracts away the technical challenges of connecting to devices/gateways and accelerates your time to market with an open, secure, and scalable platform.

Analyze – Gathering IoT data is pointless if customers can’t get value from it. IoT Cloud Service performs real-time analytics and enables big data and predictive analytics to deliver the enriched enterprise data that enables you to identify new services and improve customer satisfaction.

Integrate – IoT Cloud Service extends enterprise applications using open interfaces and pre-integrations with Oracle’s platform-as-a-service (PaaS), software-as-a-service (SaaS) and on-premise applications to reduce total cost of ownership for IoT data-enriched applications and processes.

IoT Cloud Key Features

Device Virtualization – IoT Cloud Service exposes every connected device as a set of resources. This abstracts any complexity associated with device connectivity and standardizes the integration of devices with the enterprise.

Flexible Topology – Devices can connect to the Oracle IoT Cloud Service using different types of network topologies – using client library, gateway software or

directly using REST API. This offers customers flexibility to integrate their devices with IoT Cloud Service.

Stream processing – IoT Cloud Service performs real time analysis of incoming data streams with event aggregation, filtering and correlation. With a business friendly interface, customers can quickly identify key events and exceptions at real-time.

Event Store – Analyzed data streams can be sent to integrated cloud services or enterprise applications for further processing and driving business workflows. Customers can query and visualize massive amounts of data with integrated Oracle Business Intelligence Cloud Service support and enable Big Data Analysis. Read the complete article here.

WebLogic Partner Community

For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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clip_image002What is WebLogic Server Multitenant?

Multi-tenancy (MT) in WebLogic Server (WLS) provides a sharable infrastructure for use by multiple organizations. These organizations are a conceptual grouping of your own choosing, which you can think of as tenants. By allowing one domain to support multiple tenants, WebLogic-MT improves density and achieves a more efficient use of resources.

WebLogic-MT provides resource isolation within a domain partition, an administrative and runtime slice of a WebLogic domain that is dedicated to running application instances and related resources for a tenant. Domain partitions achieve greater density by allowing application instances and related resources to share the domain, WebLogic itself, the Java virtual machine (JVM), and the operating system, while isolating tenant-specific application data, configuration, and runtime traffic. Read more about WebLogic-MT here.

What is Resource Consumption Management?

A premium feature in WebLogic-MT 12.2.1, Resource Consumption Management (RCM) provides resource isolation and tries to ensure that resources are allocated fairly to the partitions. It provides a policy infrastructure to limit usage of the shared resources and take appropriate actions when those specified limits are breached. It can also help maximize resource utilization in consolidated deployments.

Why is RCM important?

As we saw, in WebLogic-MT there can be one or more co-located partitions in a single JVM. When partitions are co-located, they may consume or compete for the low-level resources offered by the OS/JVM. Low-level resources are often limited in nature. The (over-) consumption of these resources by one partition may (adversely) impact the other co-located partitions. Therefore, in WLS-MT, where partitions are co-located, it is important to isolate these partitions and the resources consumed by these partitions.

For example: If there are 100 file-descriptors available on a particular OS running WebLogic-MT that has 2 co-located partitions, one partition may end up consuming most of the available file-descriptors, leaving absolutely nothing for the other partition (implying the affected partition cannot function as expected). The affected partition has to bear the cost of being co-located with

As we can see, the Blue tenant is affected adversely because the Red tenant consumed most of the shared resources. The solution is to enforce policies through the RCM, so that one partition does not end up consuming all the low-level resources. With RCM, the system admin can define policies so the consumption of resources by one partition does not adversely affect the other co-located partitions. Read the complete article here.

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clip_image002On my previous post, the first part of this series, I’ve shown to you how to quickly get started with WebLogic on Docker. You’ve learned how to create a base Docker image with WebLogic and Oracle JDK installed, and then how to create a second image that contains a configured WebLogic domain. Today’s post will break down and explain what happens behind the scenes of that process

Note: for the sake of history and keep this blog post useful in the future, I will refer to the commit 7741161 from the docker-images GitHub project, and version 12.2.1 of WebLogic.

Walking through the build process of a WebLogic base image

A base image of WebLogic means an image that contains only the software installed with minimum configuration, to further be extended and customized. It may be based on a Red Hat base Docker image, but preferably, we recommend you to use the Oracle Linux base image.

Samples for how to build a base image are presented in the dockerfiles folder. Files for WebLogic versions 12.1.3 and 12.2.1 are maintained there, as well for two kinds of distributions: Developer, and Generic. Other versions and distributions may be added in the future.

Differences between Developer and Generic distributions

There aren’t many differences between them, except these (extracted from the README.txt file inside the Quick Installer for Developer):

WHAT IS NOT INCLUDED IN THE QUICK INSTALLER

– Native JNI libraries for unsupported platforms.

– Samples, non-english console help (can be added by using the WLS supplemental Quick Install)

– Oracle Configuration Manager (OCM) is not included in the Quick installer

– SCA is not included in the Quick Installer

Also, the Quick Installer for Developers is compressed using pack200, an optimized compression tool for Java classes and JAR files, to reduce the download size of the installer. Besides these differences, the two distributions work perfectly fine for Java EE development and deployment.

Building the Developer distribution base image

Although we provide a handy shell script to help you in this process, what really matters relies inside 12.2.1 folder and the Dockerfile.developer file. That recipe does a COPY of two packages, the RPM of JDK, and the WebLogic Quick Installer. These files must be present. We’ve put these .download files as placeholders to remind you of the need to download them. This same approach will apply for the Generic distribution. Read the complete article here.

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clip_image002As a weblogic administrator the interaction among the application server and the database is often strong. In fact, according to Confio Software (2013) approximately 70% of applications’ performance problems are caused by the dataWith the development of partitions on Weblogic, Oracle has developed an infrastructure that is similar to containers and that takes advantage of the Weblogic server’s capacities such as clustering, transaction management and security [1].

These are the advantages of using Weblogic Server Multitenant [1]:

Time to market is improved.

  1. The complexity of moving workload to the cloud and from the cloud is reduced.
  2. It is possible to convert monolithic applications to smaller services.
  3. It allows up to 3x hardware consolidation.
  4. Reduction of OPEX by up to 25%

Since Weblogic Multitenant is based on the concept of partitions or micro containers. It is important to remark that these partitions allow the portability of applications reducing the time to market and allowing the movement to the cloud or vice versa.

Multi-tenant allows group applications that are scattered through several domains, which helps to optimize the use of hardware, making possible the reduction of OPEX.

In addition, a partition does not have any Operating System or JVM component. Applications and configuration artefacts compose partitions or micro containers and each one of these micro containers could use a managed server or a cluster.

In the following diagram, the topology shows two partitions deployed on the same cluster, which allow them sharing the JVMs that are part of that cluster.

With this in mind, in this post, I will show you how to reach the topology described based on partitions. I have created a domain with a cluster and I have an Oracle Pluggable Database available so now these are the additional elements created in this post:

1. Virtual targets. According to [2] a virtual target is the target used by a resource group at the domain level and partition level. Virtual targets are targeted to managed servers or clusters and they define access points to resources. Virtual targets give a separate HTTP per each server as in the case of virtual hosts in Weblogic Server [2]. Since virtual targets set the access to resources and resources are group by resource groups, these require one or more virtual targets. When a resource group has a global scope (related to the domain) it is possible to select any virtual target that is not assigned to a partition. On the other hand, when a resource group is assigned to a partition, this can use only available virtual targets in the partition [2]. Read the complete article here.

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clip_image002On the heels of the extremely well received FlexDeploy 3.0 release at Oracle OpenWorld in October 2015, Flexagon today announced FlexDeploy 3.1 is now available. With 3.0 users saw enhancements for Oracle Cloud, test automation, E-Business Suite, and Fusion Middleware. FlexDeploy 3.1 provides additional support for Fusion Middleware and Cloud PaaS, additional plugins for test automation, and usability improvements. FlexDeploy is a DevOps and Application Release Automation platform that significantly lowers project risk and cost, while accelerating software delivery. FlexDeploy provides a comprehensive and integrated platform for managing the entire build, deploy, test, and release lifecycle. Users are able to capitalize on their investments and innovate faster than ever, with extensive automation, improved controls, and visibility to information like never before. FlexDeploy is an open platform, which includes pre-built content for Oracle Fusion Middleware, Oracle Applications, Oracle Cloud Services and many non-Oracle tools and technologies.

FlexDeploy 3.1 Highlights

  • Fusion Middleware and Cloud PaaS Enhancements– FlexDeploy’s support for Fusion Middleware and PaaS is unparalleled, providing out of the box Build and Deployment features that enable full automation. FlexDeploy 3.1 makes additional improvements, driving further automation and consistency of Fusion Middleware and Cloud PaaS implementations.
    • WebLogic Plugin: Resource/Configuration Management – deployment of WebLogic datasources, JMS resources, and SOA Outbound Connection Pools (EIS entries).
    • WebLogic Plugin: Custom OWSM policies – added support for build and deployment of custom OWSM policies.
    • WebLogic Plugin: WLST Script Execution – support for execution of user defined WLST scripts for Fusion Middleware domains. These scripts can be written and executed for base WebLogic, SOA, WebCenter, or any other Fusion Middleware component.
    • Fusion Middleware 12.2.1 support: Oracle Fusion Middleware plugins for WebLogic, JDev, ADF, SOA, OSB, and MDS are now certified with WebLogic 12.2.1: Read the complete article here.

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