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Are you taking advantage of the shutdown and overload features in WebLogic? In this video Nicholas King,  a database administrator with Google, explains how to leverage those features to increase application availability. Watch the video here.

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Technorati Tags: PaaS,Cloud,Middleware Update,WebLogic,WebLogic Community,Oracle,OPN,Jürgen Kress

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I know that this is quite an extremist title, and my colleagues will surely get a good laugh out of it since we actually just had some quite interesting experiences with SAF.

That being said, this post is not intended to bash this technology or to say it does not work (because it actually does); it’s just that if you look at the current technological landscape there are so much better options, and at least for me, from an Architectural point of view, it would be really difficult to justify deploying a SAF Agent (or WLS JMS Bridge) based solution into a production environment.

So, my hope is that if you’re considering SAF as your way to go, the following five reasons compel you to rethink your solution, take a long look at service-orientation design priciples / patterns and possibly spare yourself some major stress and hair-pulling. This is especially true if your organization is already in version 11g / 12c and even more if SOA Suite, OAG or any other advanced integration technology is available to you. Let’s dive straight into those points:

1. You’d be setting up a backdoor into your system and opening the floodgates. SAF agents are a JMS bridging technology usually used to connect different WLS domains in a point-to-point fashion; simply put, it’s almost the rough equivalent of using a crossover cable. Moreover, these domains are commonly in different networks, have different ownership and may be hosting distinct service inventories which you should be careful of compromising by setting off such an intrusive component. Of course you’ll be setting up domain trust in order to enable SAF, but this is no more than a palliative, as the messages which are flowing through can have multiple origins (database, file, web service, another queue or topic, or anything WLS may be connected to), and they only have to reach the right JMS local destination in order to be blindly stored and forwarded by the agent. To make it worse, when these messages reach the other side, by design they will most probably make their way up to the peer’s integration / application layer, coming from the backside and creating a lot of potential issues. Read the complete article here.

WebLogic Partner Community

For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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The year 2017 is the year that Oracle’s WebLogic Application Server has become 20 years old. Started by the founder Paul Ambrose with his company WebLogic he released the first version called "Tengah". Read the complete article here.

WebLogic Partner Community

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Let’s clear about this: Oracle Management Cloud (OMC) is NOT a replacement of Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control (OEM CC) or even an equivalant. Rumours are that this will  be Oracle’s policy in a far away future, but in the meantime we focus on what they do best. OEM CC is a product for a complete management solution for your Oracle environment, OMC for monitoring and, most of all,  analyse the monitored data in your Oracle environment.

Oracle made it possible to connect these worlds by using the data of the repository of OEM CC in OMC. And that’s what this post is about.

In a previous blog about monitoring Infrastructure with OMC I installed an OMC-cloud agent on a server with OEM CC with the repository database on it.

Through this OMC-cloud agent it’s possible to monitor the assets – in a nice gui – but what I’d really like to do is use the data in the OEM CC – repository for the analytical power of Oracle Management Cloud.

My infrastructure monitoring is working since this blog by installing an OMC-cloud agent. The question is however, do I have to install an OMC-cloud agent on every node, and connect every node  to the OMC?  A part of that is true. A cloud agent is necessary on every node, but they all can be directed to 1 node where a central gateway has been installed for connection to OMC. But of course you also can install a data collector for information from the Oracle Enterprise Manager Repository.

In the documentation of IT-analytics there’s a picture with quite a nice overview: Read the complete article here.

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In a previous blog on OCCS, I covered the steps required to provision the service. As an input to the OCCS Service provisioning I was prompted to specify the number of worker nodes I required, which for my example I set to be two. Having provisioned the service, I can now start to build and run my Docker images on these worker nodes. As part of the provisioned service, I have a node dedicated to the Container Console which provides a nice web User Interface that allows me to Build, Deploy, Run and Manage Docker Containers on the worker node hosts that I provisioned as part of my service. The two worker nodes are the hosts that I will ultimately deploy and running the image of interest such as WordPress, MySQL, Oracle Database, Tomcat, Nginx, WebLogic Server or whatever you want pretty much. The Container Console makes it very easy to build, run and deploy images via a web administration console.

For those not familiar with Docker I recommend that you check out this 12 minute video by Jake Wright https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YFl2mCHdv24. Docker is being used by many developers as it provides a lightweight and repeatable way to provision a target runtime environment to support their application development and testing. The Docker based approach is less resource hungry than a VM based approach because the host kernel is shared across the containers but as with all things IT there is no silver bullet and there are limitations associated with using Docker in contrast to VMs. Read the complete article here.

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Overview

WebSocket: the standard

WebSocket is an IETF standard recognized by RFC 6455 and has the following key characteristics which make it great fit for real time applications

  • Bi-directional: both server and client an initiate a communication
  • Full duplex: once the WebSocket session is established, both server and client can communicate independent of each other
  • Less verbose (compared to HTTP)

A deep dive into the protocol is out of scope of this blog. Please refer to the RFC for further details

Java Websocket API

A standard Java equivalent (API) for this technology is defined by JSR 356. It is backed by a specification which makes it possible to have multiple implementations of the same. JSR 356 is also included as a part of the Java Enterprise Edition 7 (Java EE 7) Platform. This includes a pre-packaged (default) implementation of this API as well as integration with other Java EE technologies like EJB, CDI etc.

Tyrus

Tyrus is the reference implementation of the Java Websocket API. It is the default implementation which is packaged with Java EE 7 containers like Weblogic 12.2.1 (and above) and Glassfish (4.x). It provides both server and client side API for building web socket applications.

Tyrus grizzly module

Tyrus has a modular architecture i.e. it has different modules for server, client implementations, a SPI etc. It supports the notion of containers (you can think of them as connectors) for specific runtime support (these build on the modular setup). Grizzly is one of the supported containers which can be used for server or client (or both) modes as per your requirements (the sample application leverages the same)

About the sample application

The sample is a chat application – a canonical use case for WebSockets (this by no means a full-blown chat service). Users can

  • Join the chat room (duplicate usernames not allowed)
  • Get notified about new users joining
  • Send public messages
  • Send private messages
  • Leave the chat room (other users get notified)

Read the complete article here.

WebLogic Partner Community

For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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This blog teaches you how to deploy a simple PHP based REST microservice project on Oracle Application Container Cloud using Oracle Developer Cloud.

This post shows the essential capabilities for PHP projects management, build automation and streamlined deployment in the Oracle Cloud, using Developer Cloud Service and deploying to Application Container Cloud.

Tech Stack Usage

Eclipse: IDE for PHP development.

Grunt: Tool for building the PHP code archive for deployment.

Oracle Developer Cloud: For application lifecycle management.

Oracle Application Container Cloud: For deployment of the PHP based web service on container hosted by the cloud.

Setting up PHP and Oracle Cloud on Eclipse

Eclipse is a very popular IDE to which most of the developers from Java world are acquainted with. Eclipse caters to lot of other development environments other than Java. The same IDE can be used for our day to day PHP code development. To test the application locally you can install a cross platform web server such as XAMPP specific to the 32/64bit OS(Windows/Linux/Mac) being used. You will also need the following plugins in Eclipse:

  1. 1. PHP Development Tools (PDT): For developing PHP code in Eclipse.
  2. 2. Oracle Cloud Tools: For connecting to the Developer Cloud Service Instance

Note: These plugins can be downloaded from the Eclipse Marketplace. Below screen shots show the highlighted plugins which were installed for the PHP development and for connecting to Oracle Cloud.

Apart from these tools, you can also install cross platform web server platform such as XAMPP. It will enable us to test the PHP code that we develop on Eclipse locally, before pushing it to the Git repository of Oracle Developer Cloud Service. Below is link from where XAMPP can be downloaded. Choose the version based on the operating system and the system architecture (32/64 bit) to install upon. Read the complete article here.

WebLogic Partner Community

For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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