clip_image002Recently we added a great new feature to the ADF Performance Monitor: network and browser load time information. Now you know exactly every end-user experience of your ADF application, in real-time. You can quickly resolve any performance bottlenecks with this end-to-end visibility. You can even drill down into an individual user to analyze the experience – to understand the ADF app behavior. The dashboard is improved with several overview and detail graphs that shows the layer (database, webservice, application server, network/browser loadtime) where the time is spent of your application. This is very useful to troubleshoot problems.

The ADF Performance Monitor is an advanced tool specifically build for ADF applications and is aware of the intricacies of the ADF framework. It traces key ADF actions across tiers and services to provide end-to-end visibility and automatically maps each tier to easily visualize the relationship between them. This Tracing provides deep visibility into the cause of application performance issues down to the tiniest detail. Click here for more information.

Network Time and Browser Load Time

Network time is the time that it takes to send a HTTP request from a browser (http request network time) to the application server and from the application server back to the browser (http response network time). The browser loadtime is the time that a browser needs to build up the DOM tree and load the page. Read the complete article here.

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clip_image002Once we identify a pattern and are certain it’s going to happen again, our code reuse mentality breaks loose. It’s only a matter of time until we end up with a shiny new tool in our code toolbox. This is especially true when we know that plugging in an existing piece of code can save us significant time and effort the next time around.

The initial development of an ADF Standalone application is such a pattern primed for code reuse. I think anyone would agree that bootstrapping an ADF standalone application becomes a repetitive task. On the other hand agreeing that just performing the initial required setup to start the implementation of the actual project requirements can take significant time and effort might not be as clear.

Let’s go over the initial setup considerations of an ADF Standalone application at a high level to have a basic understanding of why it takes significant time and effort. Among the main goals of an ADF standalone application is to deliver an engaging user experience. There are a lot of aspects to consider when we create a user experience not only visual but also functional. To list a few:

1. Consistent look and feel

2. Layout design

3. Effective user interfaces

4. Usability

5. Security

Security is an aspect that is often overlooked and underestimated. How to authenticate users with the corresponding login and logout functionality and how to authorize users to access only what they should among other things. From my experiences implementing these aspects I can vouch that it takes significant time and effort.   

I must point out an additional benefit of bootstrapping your ADF standalone applications as clients themselves have asked for it. The benefit is standardization of ADF standalone application development within the organization. Read the complete article here.

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clip_image002ADF Business Components can be exposed as SOAP Services. Application Module provides Service Interfaces as a way to define operations for the services to be exposed. Custom methods written in AMImpl class can also be exposed as operation of web services.
But one of the limitation is that there is restriction on return types from the services exposed as service interface from Application Module.
In this post we will see how easily we can develop a web service using ADF BC Service Interface and can tweak/use one of the given returnType List<ViewRowImpl> to return list of complex type object.
Use case here is to create an operation in ApplicationModuleImpl class to return List of Object consiting of three variables -  DepartmentName,ManagerId,IsManagerFlag and expose the operation as ADF BC Service Interface SOAP Service. (Jdeveloper 11.1.1.7)
So Lets get started
Created a simple ADF Web Application using HR Schema and created DepartmentsEO , VO and AM and there respective Java Classes.
Create a Programmatic VO – WSResultPVO which will be returned from the operation of the WebService.
Now Add three variables in the PVO. DepartmentName,ManagerId and IsManagerFlag. Read the complete article here.

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Dear WebLogic Partner Community,

Oracle is cloud ready! You can get trained on the cloud, resell cloud service and run cloud marketing events! The registration page for our Fusion Middleware Summer Camps V is open. You can choose between 5 different hands-on tracks: Mobile and Mobile Cloud Service, BPM Suite 12c and Process Cloud Service, Hybrid Integration with Integration Cloud Service, SOA Suite Cloud Service and SOA 12c, Java Cloud Services and Extending SaaS with PaaS. Don’t wait too long with your registration, like last year we expect to be booked out!

We would highly encourage you to submit a Fusion Middleware Innovation Awards 2015 nomination – specially if you implemented successful our Fusion Middleware 12c releases like WebLogic 12c, ADF and MAF 12c which might include a mobile application and a cloud service.

Want to become ready for the latest version of Java Cloud and Developer Cloud? Attend the Java Cloud Community Webcast on-demand, read the Creating and Managing a Java Cloud Service tutorial and watch the

Developer Cloud Service Video. Thanks also to Simon for his nice blog post about Java Cloud Service!

Thanks to the community for all the excellent WebLogic articles: WebLogic Server on Docker, WebLogic Server on Linux 7, Sample Coherence Cluster in Weblogic 12c, Diagnosing performance issues and Creating graphs from DMS Metrics

Andrejus published in our ADF and Mobile section of the newsletter, a short series about WebSocket and MAF make sure you read part 1 and part 2. Atla and UI continue to be an important topics, great example is the Alta UI for Siebel or iQuery notifications in ADF. Thanks to the community for all the excellent development tool articles: ADF Application Event listeners, Change Default JSESSION ID Name, Allow user to personalize forms, Remove Unused Namespaces in JDeveloper and ADF Logging

Best regards
Jürgen Kress

To read the complete newsletter please visit http://tinyurl.com/weblogicNewsMay2015  (OPN Account required)

To become a member of the WebLogic Partner Community please register at http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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clip_image002You should check my previous post about Background REST Service Access with A-Team Mobile Persistence Accelerator (AMPA). There I describe how to optimise MAF performance for REST service calls, allow user to continue working with the mobile application, without locking the screen until Web Service response arrives. Steven Davelaar have documented how it works, you can read it in his blog – Calling Web Services in Background Using MAF 2.1.
I have updated sample application from previous post, to include indicator for AMPA background service call status tracking. Updated sample application – MobileServiceBusApp_v8.zip.
AMPA provides application scope variable, which acts as a flag and indicates when background service call is executed. Based on this flag, we could conditionally display animated GIF image, this will help user to understand if background service call still runs:

When user is searching and request is being processed in background, he will see rotating status indicator in the top right corner: Read the complete article here.

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clip_image001Want to alert your customer to a special loyalty discount offer when they enter the menswear department in one of your retail stores?  Want to present information about a famous artist’s life when a visitor to your museum nears one of the artist’s paintings?  These are just two of the many real-world scenarios made possible by the use of iBeacon technology.

This blog post provides an introduction to iBeacon technology and a description of how to build two different MAF apps – one that pretends to be an iBeacon and another that detects iBeacons and uses the local notifications functionality provided in MAF 2.1.1 to inform the user, even when the app isn’t even running.

To deploy these apps to iOS devices you will need an iOS developer account.

What is a beacon?

A beacon is a device that is intentionally conspicuous to draw attention to a location, such as a lighthouse sitting on the edge of a cliff.

In in the Internet of Things (or IoT), a beacon is a small electronic device that transmits a regular radio signal according to the Bluetooth v4 Low Energy spec (otherwise known as “BLE”).  A beacon typically does no more than advertise its existence by transmitting a unique identifier and can last for months on a single cell battery.

Any BLE-enabled device, such as a modern smartphone, can detect a beacon by listening for BLE-based transmissions.

Whilst the possibilities appear endless, typical applications for beacons currently include retail stores, exhibition halls, museums, places of employment and homes, where users can be alerted to information pertaining to their current location within a building.

What is (an) iBeacon?

iBeacon is a technology introduced by Apple in iOS 7 that defines a standard for how a beacon identifies itself (or “advertises”) in its BLE transmissions.  Any beacon that implements this standard can be called an iBeacon.

Most beacon manufacturers implement the iBeacon standard by default, whilst some can also be configured to use their own proprietary protocol.  It’s also possible to configure a post-2012 iOS device, or Mac running OS X Mavericks (not Yosemite), to act as an iBeacon.

Whilst the iBeacon technology is included in the iOS Core Location framework since iOS 7, any BLE-enabled device can detect iBeacons and various libraries exist for use on devices running Android 4.3 or above.

How does iBeacon work? Read the complete article here.

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clip_image002One of the new features in version 2.1.1. of Oracle MAF are local notifications.
These notifications originate within the MAF application and are received by the same application. They are delivered to the end user through standard mechanisms supported by the mobile device platform (for example, banner, sound) and can work when the application is either in the foreground, background or not running at all.
I this post I show you an example of how to work with Local Notifications from Java. I use a simple MAF app. I will not explain how to build this app, but the source can be downloaded here. It is mainly derived from the "LocalNotificationDemo" public sample app.
Introducing Local Notifications
As with many framework features, MAF supports three ways to set Local Notifications. First you can use the device features datacontrol. To support declarative use of Local Notifications, the DeviceFeatures data control includes the addLocalNotification and cancelLocalNotification methods, which enable MAF applications to leverage a device’s interface for managing notifications so end users can schedule or cancel local notifications.

Second you have the option to set Local Notifications from JavaScript. MAF allows you to manage local notifications using JavaScript APIs in the adf.mf.api.localnotification namespace. The methods add() and cancel() are available. More info on this is available from the developer guide (see resources at the end of this post).
Finally you can set Local Notifications from Java code, which is what I will explain in the remaining part of this post.
Set up the Listening Part
Because the Listening part is the same for all methods mentioned above I will start to explain this before going into detail for setting Local Notifications from Java code.
The concept of Local Notifications is from an MAF perspective not different from Push Notifications
First we need to create an eventListener that specifically listens for Local Notifications.
This class must implement oracle.adfmf.framework.event.EventListener.
In this class we must use the onMessage() method, which will fire when a notification is received. Read the complete article here.

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