clip_image002One of the new features in version 2.1.1. of Oracle MAF are local notifications.
These notifications originate within the MAF application and are received by the same application. They are delivered to the end user through standard mechanisms supported by the mobile device platform (for example, banner, sound) and can work when the application is either in the foreground, background or not running at all.
I this post I show you an example of how to work with Local Notifications from Java. I use a simple MAF app. I will not explain how to build this app, but the source can be downloaded here. It is mainly derived from the "LocalNotificationDemo" public sample app.
Introducing Local Notifications
As with many framework features, MAF supports three ways to set Local Notifications. First you can use the device features datacontrol. To support declarative use of Local Notifications, the DeviceFeatures data control includes the addLocalNotification and cancelLocalNotification methods, which enable MAF applications to leverage a device’s interface for managing notifications so end users can schedule or cancel local notifications.

Second you have the option to set Local Notifications from JavaScript. MAF allows you to manage local notifications using JavaScript APIs in the adf.mf.api.localnotification namespace. The methods add() and cancel() are available. More info on this is available from the developer guide (see resources at the end of this post).
Finally you can set Local Notifications from Java code, which is what I will explain in the remaining part of this post.
Set up the Listening Part
Because the Listening part is the same for all methods mentioned above I will start to explain this before going into detail for setting Local Notifications from Java code.
The concept of Local Notifications is from an MAF perspective not different from Push Notifications
First we need to create an eventListener that specifically listens for Local Notifications.
This class must implement oracle.adfmf.framework.event.EventListener.
In this class we must use the onMessage() method, which will fire when a notification is received. Read the complete article here.

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At our WebLogic Community Workspace (WebLogic Community membership required) we published the Mobile Bootcamp training material from the Community Forum in Budapest.

clip_image002Oracle Mobile Application Framework (Oracle MAF) is a framework for building on-device mobile application, allowing you to embrace a mobile strategy whilst exploiting your current enterprise skills.  Based around Java, HTML5, JavaScript and CSS, you will be able to quickly build and deploy applications to both iOS and Android mobile platforms.  This workshop will take you step-by-step through the creation of a mobile application using Oracle Mobile Application Framework (MAF), building pages, page flows, building data services, consuming REST services, security and device integration.

For more information please visit the MAF tag here (WebLogic Community membership required)

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clip_image002A while ago I came into touch with ThreadLogic. Most of the people whom I was talking about it, did not know the tool. This unfamiliarity with ThreadLogic made me decide to write this blog. I think that every WebLogic Administrator should know ThreadLogic and that it is also a very interesting tool for Fusion Middleware Developers.

But let me start at the beginning. A while ago Michael Sahadat, a SOA/Integration Architect at Oracle, came over to help me solve a performance issue. He was using ThreadLogic and explained me how it helped us at the end to detect the performance bottleneck. But that I will explain later on. First I will tell about ThreadLogic.

What is ThreadLogic?

ThreadLogic is a Thread Dump Analysis tool. Thread Dump Analysis is a key tool for performance tuning and troubleshooting of Java based applications.

Most TDA tools dont mention the type of activity within a thread, should it be treated as normal or deserving a closer look? Can a pattern or anti-pattern be applied against them? Any possible optimizations? Are there any hot spots? Any classification of threads based on their execution cycles? ThreadLogic is created by the Oracle Fusion Middleware Architect Team (A-Team) to address these deficiencies.

Once a thread dump is parsed and threads details are populated, each of the thread is then analyzed against matching advisories and tagged appropriately. The threads are also associated with specific Thread Groups based on functionality or thread group name.

The current version of ThreadLogic is V2.0.217. Since version 2.0.215 it contains support for SOA 12c.

How did ThreadLogic help us?

After creating two threaddumps in WebLogic we loaded them in ThreadLogic. ThreadLogic immediately gave a Warning. Bottleneck among threads.

Opening the dump tree and selecting the Advisory Map show a Map with information about the health of the system under investigation. Each of the advisory has a health level indicating severity of the issue found, pattern, name, keyword and related advice. As you can see in the picture below, our system has a number of FATAL and WARNING issues. Read the complete article here.

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Oracle’s Coherence product management director, Craig Blitz, introduces the 12.1.3 release and its two key themes of developer productivity and developer agility. New features such as JCache and the recently added support for the MemCached API are also mentioned. Watch the video here.

For more information visit the Coherence tag (WebLogic Community membership required)

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clip_image002Introduced in Weblogic 12.1.2, dynamic clusters is a great feature to scale your private cloud.
Dynamic clusters provides you easy scaling of Weblogic clusters by adding and removing managed server instances on demand. They contain one or more dynamic servers. These dynamic servers are based on a single servertemplate that guarantees that every member of the cluster is exactly the same.

Creating Dynamic Clusters

Let’s take a look at some of the possibilities as we create a dynamic cluster.

I have created a virtualbox environment.
This environment consists of four VM’s with the following specs.

  • 2 vCPU’s
  • 4 Gb memory
  • 50 Gb disk
  • Oracle Linux 6.6
  • Java 1.7.0_75
  • Weblogic 12.1.3.0.2

I created a simple domain called demo_domain with only an AdminServer and four machines.
After unpacking the domain to the four servers, the nodemanagers where started and are reachable by the AdminServer.

Now let go through the process of creating a dynamic cluster.
Open the Weblogic Console and navigate to Environment -> Clusters
Lock and Edit the domain in the Change Center. Read the complete article here.

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clip_image002My first attempt with Docker was from my Windows host machine using boot2docker, as described in this article: https://technology.amis.nl/2015/03/15/my-first-steps-with-docker-starting-from-windows-as-the-host/. Boot2docker is a great tool for being able to work with Docker on a Windows machine. However, I ran into limitations – such as not being able to create containers with the GUI applications running in them. Besides, Linux seems to be – for now at least – the more natural environment for Docker. So decided to create a Linux VM – actually a Virtual Box VM – that would serve as my Docker host.

In this article I will walk through the steps I went through in order to get this Linux VM running on my Windows host and subsequently turn that VM into the Docker Server in which one or more containers will be running – eventually to serve as demo and training environments, for example with Oracle Databases and Middleware. After all, Mark Nelson showed the way in this wonderful article: https://redstack.wordpress.com/2014/11/14/gettingn-to-know-docker-a-better-way-to-do-virtualization/.

I decided to closely follow Mark’s lead in his choice of Linux VM: Ubunty 14.04.1, to be created using Vagrant (about which I have blogged before – for example https://technology.amis.nl/2014/06/26/provisioning-an-oracle-11g-database-virtualbox-vm-with-vagrant-and-puppet-for-dummies/ ).

Stage One – Create Ubuntu VM using Vagrant

I have both Vagrant and Virtual Box set up on my laptop. From that starting point, I open a command line window and create directory into which to create the Vagrant configuration for the VM. Read the complete article here.

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clip_image002We are very excited to announce that Oracle WebLogic Server is now certified to run on Docker containers. As part of the certification, we are releasing Dockerfiles and supporting scripts on GitHub to build images for Oracle WebLogic Server.  These images are built as an extension of existing Oracle Linux images Oracle Linux Images. You can use these Oracle WebLogic Server Docker images or create your own. To help you with this, we have posted Dockerfiles and scripts on GitHub as examples for you to get started.

Docker is a platform that enables users to build, package, ship and run distributed applications. Docker users package up their applications, and any dependent libraries or files, into a Docker image. Docker images are portable artifacts that can be distributed across Linux environments. Images that have been distributed can be used to instantiate containers where applications can run in isolation from other applications running in other containers on the same host operating system.

The table below describes the certification provided for various WebLogic Server versions. You can use these combinations of Oracle WebLogic Server, JDK, Linux and Docker versions when building your Docker images. Read the complete article here.

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